Tag: amateur

Where Are They Now? GHTBL Players Leading Impressive Careers

Recently, Rainbow Graphics player-manager Jason Valliere accepted a role as Assistant Sports Information Director at the United Coast Guard Academy in New London, Connecticut. Congratulations to Jason on his latest career move! Jason is on a path to a promising career in sports. He joins the countless number of twilight players who have worked for high profile institutions – men who have led inspiring careers in athletics, business, and public service.

Jason Valliere, Player-manager, Rainbow Graphics

Hundreds of twilight leaguers have made their mark in a wide array of professions and careers. From coaching to teaching to sales and management, you might say that GHTBL alumni help keep the economy going. And you might be wondering, “where are they now?” Well, here’s a list of former twilight players and their current occupation followed by their company or organization:

  • Ryan Aiken, Operations Manager & Treasurer, High Grade Gas Service, Inc.
  • Greg Annino, Senior Field Technician, Greenskies Clean Energy
  • Chris Anselmo, Realtor, Marino Realty
  • Brian Archibald, Special Education Teacher, Bristol Central High School
  • Jeff Bagwell, Special Advisor, Houston Astros
  • Steve Bartunek, Insurance Agent, RDDK
  • Andy Baylock, Director, UConn Football Alumni/Community Affairs
  • Ken Bratina, Program Director, Connecticut Junior Republic
  • Conor Bremer, Supplier Program Manager, Dynetics, Inc.
  • *Brett Burnham, Financial Advisor, Northwestern Mutual
  • *Steve Cannata, Head Coach, Kingswood-Oxford School Baseball
  • Clarke Caudill, Area Sales Manager, Intuitive
  • Tony Cekovsky, Regional Account Manager, Monster Energy
  • *Jack Champagne, Teacher, Longmeadow School District
  • *Paul Ciotto, Engineering Director, Aetna
  • Rob Cipolla, MSSP Sales, IBM
  • Chris Corkum, Founder, Chris Corkum’s Baseball, Inc.
  • *Scott Cormier, Vice President of Purchasing, Katsiroubas Produce
  • *Tony Dedominicis, Musician
  • Tyler Dew, Attorney and Claim Director, Chubb Insurance
  • Ryan DiPietro, Senior Environmental Inspector, BL Companies
  • Mark DiTommaso, Kitchen Designer, EHL Kitchens
  • Doug Elliot Jr., Financial Advisor, Marcum LLP
  • Doug Elliot Sr., President, The Hartford (retired)
  • Jake Fournier, Financial Manager, Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison LLP
  • Paul Gallo, Lead Instructor, Los Angeles Dodgers Training Academy
  • *Ralph Giansanti Jr., Financial Advisor, Infinex Investments, Inc.
  • *Roberto Giansiracusa, Owner, GimaSport
  • John Gieras, Teacher, Somers Public Schools
  • *Kevin Gieras, Detective, New York Police Department
  • TJ Grande, Senior IT Business Management Specialist, Burns and McDonnell
  • Matt Grosso, EVP of Business Development, Wentworth DeAngelis & Kaufman Insurance
  • Jerry Hasler, Vice President, Forestville Manufacturing
  • Mike Hepple, Insurance Broker, Wentworth, DeAngelis & Kaufman Insurance
  • Rick Hewey, Contract Administrator, Hartford HealthCare
  • Charlie Hickey, Head Coach, Central Connecticut State University Baseball
  • Dan Hickey, Client Manager II, Lockton Companies
  • Nick Hock, Batting Practice Specialist, Delmarva Shorebirds (Baltimore Orioles)
  • Matt Hodges, Off Campus Operations Manager, University of Pennsylvania
  • Jack Hurley, Pension Consultant, PASI
  • *Scott Jeamel, VP Financial Consultant, Charles Schwab
  • Dave Katz, Owner, Katz Sport Shop
  • Chris Kehoe, Technical Architect, TriZetto Group
  • *Tom Kirby, Chief Financial Officer, JE Shepard Company
  • *Steve Krajewski, Assistant Director, Vernon Parks and Recreation Department (Retired)
  • John Kubachka, Operations Manager, Town of Newington
  • James Kukucka, Financial Analyst, Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation
  • Ryan Lamarche, Owner, RDL Painting
  • **Gary LaRocque, Director of Player Development, St. Louis Cardinals
  • Matt Lavatori, Vice President of Client Services, Fred C. Church Insurance
  • Marc Levin, Owner, Malloves Jewelers
  • Derek Litke, Business Develop Manager, Triumph Group
  • *Jason Maule, Physical Education Teacher, Meriden Public Schools
  • *Brian Marshall, Field Reimbursement Manager, Novartis
  • Steve Matyczyk, Principal, Tariffville Elementary School
  • Frank McCoy Jr., Personal Injury Attorney, McCoy & McCoy
  • Adam McLaughlin, Senior Vice President, Webster Bank
  • *Todd Mercier, Manager, Murray Kaizer Inc.
  • Daryl Morhardt, Head Coach, Housatonic High School Baseball 
  • Greg Morhardt, Professional Scout, Boston Red Sox
  • Mike Mowel, Chief Accounting Officer, Safepoint Holdings
  • *Walter Nakonechny, Science Department Chair, Rockville High School
  • Tyler Olander, Assistant Coach, University of Saint Joseph Men’s Basketball
  • Basilio Ortiz, Youth Services Officer, CT Department of Children and Families
  • Cory Parker, Sales Manager, AnnieMac Home Mortgage
  • Joe Parlante, Sales Account Manager at New England Industrial Supply
  • Jim Penders, Head Coach, UConn Baseball
  • *Adam Peters, Corporate Safety Director, KBE Building
  • Kevin Powell, Second Vice President, Travelers (retired)
  • *Bunty Ray, Teacher and Coach, Bristol Eastern High School
  • Cory Riordan, Pitching Coach, Dunedin Blue Jays (Toronto Blue Jays)
  • Kevin Rival, Founder, CT Rivals AAU Program
  • Jake Ruder, Manager, Fastenal
  • Peter Rynkowski, Senior Executive Recruiter, Ed-Exec, Inc.
  • *Dave Sacco, Operating Manager, Rhino Insurance Services
  • *Harvey Shapiro, Manager, Wareham Gatemen (retired)
  • *Michael Schweighoffer, Chief Lending Officer, Farmington Bank
  • Jim Shannon, Owner, Metro Communications
  • Charlie Shover, Plant Manager, Corsicana Mattress Company
  • *Jim Snediker, Commercial Insurance Leader, Travelers
  • Chris Strahowski, Teacher, Windham Technical H.S. & Adjunct Professor, SCSU
  • David Swanson, KZone Producer, ESPN and Founder of Swanson Baseball
  • Rob Tenzca, Project Manager, Arcadis
  • Tom Thibodeau, Head Coach, New York Knicks
  • **Leo Veleas, Head Coach, Berlin High School
  • Pete Walker, Pitching Coach, Toronto Blue Jays
  • Justin Waz, Director of Revenue Operations, RecDesk Software
  • Josue Zamora, Police Officer, State of Connecticut
  • *James Ziogas Jr. Attorney at Law, Ziogas Law

*GHTBL Hall of Fame Inductee
**GHTBL Hall of Fame Gold Glove Honoree

Comment below with your addition to this list.

12 Inducted to GHTBL Hall of Fame, Class of 2023

The Greater Hartford Twilight League inducted a dozen into the Hall of Fame on Saturday, November, 19, 2023 at Indian Hill Country Club in Newington. Among the inductees were GHTBL President, Bill Holowaty as well as Kevin Beaudoin, Steve Cannata, Jack Champagne, Scott Jeamel, Tom Kirby, Walt Nakonechny, Adam Peters, Bunty Ray, Dave Sacco, Bobby Stefanik and Mike Susi. GHTBL Hall of Fame President, Steve Krajewski was the master of ceremonies.


Congratulations to all coaches and ballplayers! This class represents some of the top baseball names in the Greater Hartford area from the 1960’s to 2000’s. The event brochure, written by GHTBL Hall of Fame Committee Member Jack Hurley, will be posted at a later date. Here’s the presenting words given by the League Secretary inducting Bill Holowaty:

I’m proud to present the induction of our President, Bill Holowaty to the Executive Committee, recognizing league officials. Coach Holowaty is just the 10th person to earn this honor and the first since Jim Gallagher. What people might not realize about Bill is that he’s one of Connecticut’s all-time amateur sports figures.

He played basketball at UConn starting in 1964 – not too long ago. While in college he appeared in the Hartford Twilight League with Hamilton Standard. His teammates were fellow Hall of Fame inductees, Wally Widholm, Hal Lewis and Bill Risley. Holowaty only played for a few summers before graduating and embarking on a coaching career at Eastern – a fledgling college at the time. 

He built up the program by installing an attitude of toughness and hard work. His demands for excellence were unparalleled. Bill won his 1000th game at Eastern in the year 2000. The Warriors went to 39 postseasons in 45 years under Holowaty, who won 4 National Titles and a total of 1,412 games – more than any coach in New England. 

He led the project to build a baseball stadium at Eastern and it really should be called Bill Holowaty Stadium if you consider all that he achieved. Though he did help start the NECBL, Coach sent hundreds of players to the Twilight League. For example, one of his former players, Jim Schult has helped the East Hartford Jets win the last 4 championships.

After retiring from coaching, he agreed to be Twilight President in 2017. Everyone continued to call him Coach Holowaty and he immediately made us more competitive. He gave veteran players and longtime managers new energy. He started a golf tournament/fundraiser with Marc Levin. With Bill at the helm, the league has raised over $25,000 for charities with benefit games at Dunkin’ Park. A lot of his contributions have also been thanks to his wife Jan.  

Bill has has seen many obstacles for a guy born in 1945 from Little Falls, New York. He has fought through controversy and illness, and has won again and again. His sports career is rivaled by few. Before our state had Geno Auriemma, Jim Calhoun or Dan Hurley, we had Coach Holowaty winning National Championships. The Greater Hartford Twilight League is grateful for his leadership. We are in the best financial position we’ve even been in and he hasn’t asked for anything in return.

Coach, you’re now one of the Hall of Fame’s most well-known “baseball guys” – right up there with Phil Rizzuto an Honorary Member. Let’s put it this way; you’re one of two people in this room with a Wikipedia page. You are highly regarded, even today in this forgetful world. You’re a friend and a great role model. You’re one of a kind. Congratulations on the induction.

Bill Holowaty inducted to GHTBL Hall of Fame by Weston Ulbrich, League Secretary, 11/18/23.

You’re Invited to the 6th Annual Buzzy Levin Golf Tournament

Another year, another golf tournament! GHTBL’s 6th Annual Buzzy Levin Golf Tournament is scheduled for Sunday, September 17, 2023 at Blackledge Country Club at 180 West St, Hebron, CT.

The general public, alumni, current players, family and friends are welcome to sign up a foursome today using this registration form: https://tinyurl.com/s78a9ed7. Or become a Tee Sign sponsor – $100 donation each (W-9 available to all donors).

For full details, itinerary, registration and to sponsor, use the following form at https://tinyurl.com/s78a9ed7

Celebrating the Life of Ray Gliha, National Champion

Recently on August 14, 2023, a former player of the GHTBL, Raymond E. Gliha passed away peacefully at his home in Manchester, Connecticut. Gliha was born December 23, 1959, and was a lifelong Manchester resident. He was known to have a witty sense of humor. He would often write a poem or limerick for friends and family on their birthday and anniversary celebrations. People close to Ray knew him as the life of the party, a very loyal friend and an avid Boston Red Sox fan.

1980 Eastern Connecticut State College Baseball Team

Ray Gliha was passionate about baseball and he excelled on the diamond for many teams. He played for Manchester High School and Manchester American Legion Post 102 before going on to Eastern Connecticut State College. He had a batting average of .375 as a walk-on Freshman in 1979 under the guidance of Head Coach Bill Holowaty. Throughout his college career, Gliha batted .345 with 212 hits, 20 home runs and 161 RBI in 175 games. He tied a national record with six hits in one game. He started at all three outfield positions on four straight NCAA Division III postseason teams.

Ray Gliha (left) dives back to second base, Eastern Connecticut, 1982.
Ray Gliha (left) homers for Eastern Connecticut, 1982.

During his senior season, Gliha played center field and batted .395 with 7 home runs and 47 RBI. He was tri-captain that year, the team MVP and a 3rd Team All-American. Eastern went on to play in the 1982 Division III World Series in Marietta, Ohio. Gliha scored the go-ahead run in two of the games. Then in a 12-inning thriller, Eastern beat California State Stanislaus, 9-8, thanks to Gliha’s bases loaded single. It was Eastern Connecticut Baseball’s first of five national titles.

Hartford Courant excerpt, June 10, 1982.

Ray Gliha also competed in the Greater Hartford Twilight Baseball League for 17 consecutive seasons. His twi-loop career began in 1979 for Gene Johnson’s Moriarty Brothers and ended in 1995 with the same franchise (changed names to Newman Lincoln-Mercury in 1990). Gliha was named to the GHTBL All-Star team at least three times, and he won the league’s Gold Glove Award in 1989. In total, Gliha earned 4 Season Titles and 6 Playoff Championships as a top outfielder in the Twilight League.

Newspaper advertisement for Moriarty Brothers, 1982.

In 2002, Gliha was inducted into the ECSU Athletic Hall of Fame. His game-winning hit in the National Title game was fondly remembered at the induction. His level of play raised the bar for Eastern Connecticut Baseball for years to come. Gliha was said to have enjoyed his years playing baseball, especially because that’s where he accumulated many of his life-long friends.

Moriarty Brothers Wins Twilight Title, 1984.

Towards the end of his baseball career, Ray Gliha was interviewed by local sportswriter, Ed Yost of the Hartford Courant. When asked about his long association with the game, Gliha said, “Baseball is in my blood.” Then he recalled his favorite season:

“The best (Twi) team I played on was in 1980. We had a well-balanced team but when we picked up Bill Masse and Chris Peterson (both out of high school) we were even better. We won both the regular season and playoffs and by big margins. We had a lot of guys who could hit the ball out of here. We just blew the other teams away. We’ve been successful because we have been able to get guys who know how to play. All of our guys have college or pro experience. Gene has been fun to play for. He wants to win and if you give 100% he’s satisfied. His motto has been to play hard and have fun.”

Ray Gliha, 1994.

Jets Soar to Four Straight Playoff Championships

The East Hartford Jets are GHTBL’s 2023 Playoff Champion and have now won their fourth consecutive postseason. Jim Schult was once again the ace on the mound for East Hartford. His pitching performances were unmatched. In two complete games against M&T Bank, he gave up just 7 hits over 14 innings while striking out 24 opposing batters. Schult has been a key two-way player (also an outfielder and DH) for this Jets dynasty.

As for other major contributors, East Hartford’s shortstop, Jeff Criscuolo, earned his sixth career playoff title and his first as player-manager. Additional leadership was provided by General Manager Chris Kehoe who served as Third Base Coach. Kehoe is the longest contributing member of the Jets (since 1991). Corey Plasky had an amazing postseason to match his torrid hitting pace during the Regular Season. At one point Plasky made a diving play at second base to save two runs in their semi-final game against M&T Bank.

Manny Alejandro, the player with the most seasons as a Jet, was a very reliable starting pitcher. First year player Darrion Williams was just as impressive with several complete game appearances on the mound. Relief pitcher and Twi-loop veteran, Taylor Kosakowski has now won seven GHTBL Playoff Championships, a league-high among active players. A balanced mix of older and younger members of the team has been a winning formula.

Congratulations to this year‘s championship team as well as the other clubs who competed deep into the playoffs. Until next year, GHTBL extends sincere gratitude to all of our fans, players, managers and umpires for their commitment and dedication to amateur baseball.

(Featured image photograph by Phil Ledwith.)

2023 GHTBL Playoff Tournament Palmer Field

GHTBL’s 2023 Postseason to be Busier Than Ever

The 2023 GHTBL Playoff Tournament will begin on Monday, August 7, at two sites: Palmer Field in Middletown and McKenna Field in East Hartford. As always, a double-elimination tournament will crown a Playoff Champion. Admission will be $10 for one adult all-tournament pass. Kids ages 14 and under will be free of charge. Concessions to be available at Palmer Field. Dave Hutchins of Vernon will serve as PA announcer.

The postseason usually brings out some of the twilight league’s best baseball and closest games. That should be the case this year, though seeding is yet to be determined for the playoffs – as most teams are still contending in the Regular Season. Here is the playoff bracket that will be updated during the tournament on the GHTBL homepage:

2023 GHTBL Playoff Tournament Bracket 2

League note: The traditional format of the Greater Hartford Twilight Baseball League is to present the Regular Season and Playoff Tournament as two separate seasons. The Regular Season dictates the seed of each team for the Playoff Tournament. No less than 5 Regular Season appearances qualifies a player for the Playoffs. At the start of the Playoffs, all player stats are reset to zero.

Then, on Friday, August 18, the Connecticut Champions Cup will begin. The competition has been organized by four summer leagues in our state – GHTBL, Connecticut Twilight League, West Haven Twilight League and Tri-State Baseball League. GHTBL Managers will be selecting an all-star team. Special edition hats and jerseys to be provided by league. The cup format will be a double-elimination tournament held at the following sites:

8/18 – Ceppa Field, Meriden

8/19 – Fussenich Park, Torrington

8/20 – Finals at Muzzy Field, Bristol

Connecticut Champions Cup GHTBL Logo

More details to follow.

2023 Vernon Orioles

1st Place O’s Nest 11 Straight, Leading Fight for Top Playoff Seed

After a 1-4 start to the season, the Vernon Orioles are now first place in the standings. The O’s have won 11 consecutive games. Dan Trubia is near the top of the leaderboard with 16 RBI, Peter Kelly is tied for the most home runs (3) and Jason Ray is pacing the O’s with 5 wins and a league-leading 49 strikeouts.

Vernon is one of GHTBL’s most storied franchises. The first Vernon Orioles team joined the league in 1966. Mostly due to their success in recent years under Manager Jack Ceppetelli and several returning players, the franchise has amassed a total of 10 Season Titles and 6 Playoff Championships.

Not far behind Vernon are four other teams with plenty of time to make an ascent up the league table. East Hartford Jets and M&T Bank are tied for second place right now. Rainbow Graphics have the most wins (13) but have dropped a few head-to-head matchups with Vernon. Per usual, Record-Journal Expos are also knocking on the door.

League note: The traditional format of the Greater Hartford Twilight Baseball League is to present the Regular Season and Playoffs as two separate seasons. The Regular Season dictates the seed of each team for the Playoff Tournament. No less than 5 Regular Season appearances qualifies a player for the Playoffs. At the start of the Playoffs, all player stats are reset to zero and a double-elimination tournament decides a Playoff Champion.

2021 Charlie Hesseltine Meriden GHTBL Record Journal Expos

Hesseltine’s 4-Hitter, Hendrickson’s Homer Carry R-J Expos to Latest Twilight Win

By Ron Buck, Special to the Record-Journal

MERIDEN — Where were you in 2002?

Charlie Hesseltine was 18, fresh out of Maloney High School and throwing his first pitches for the Greater Hartford Twilight Baseball League team that would become the Record-Journal Expos.

Fast forward to Tuesday night.

Now 38, Hesseltine was on the mound for the Expos — better than ever — in making quick work of the South Windsor Phillies.

The veteran southpaw twirled a four-hit complete game in beating the Phillies 3-1 in a GHTBL affair that lasted just over 90 minutes at Ceppa Field.

Hesseltine’s battery mate, A.J. Hendrickson, provided the offensive fireworks. The catcher not only launched a towering two-run home run in the bottom of the sixth inning, he also drove in the tying run with a solid single in the fourth inning.

Hendrickson finished the game 2-for-3, while Jack Rich was 1-for-2 with a double to the right-field fence ahead of Hendrickson’s blast.

Phillies starter Luke Mathewson matched Hesseltine through five innings before allowing Rich’s double and then Hendrickson’s home run. Mathewson had allowed just three hits — all in the fourth inning when the Expos tied the game 1-1.

Hesseltine, toeing the rubber in his 17th season for a Meriden-based squad, finished strong after allowing all four Phillies’ hits over the first three innings. Overall, Hesseltine struck out seven 20-somethings en route to lifting the Expos to 8-5. 

The Phillies fell to 3-9.

“At my age, location is the key,” dead-panned Hesseltine, who until this season had played the role of player-coach of the Expos.

“All my pitches were working; and as long as I locate my pitches, they can’t put the barrel on the ball,” Hesseltine added. “If I’m middle-middle, they are hitting it a long way.

“My goal is to miss their barrels and let my defense do the work,” Hesseltine continued. “And, tonight, they did a great job behind me.”

Hesseltine was drafted by the Texas Rangers as a teenager out of high school. He would spend three seasons in the minor leagues before returning to Meriden. 

A staple with the Expos, Hesseltine allowed his only run Tuesday in the third inning.

Down 1-0, Hesseltine proceeded to retire the Phillies in order in three of the next four innings. Hesseltine’s shutdown performance allowed the Expos to tie the game in the fourth and then for Henrickson to win things in the sixth inning.

The Phillies’ only threat after scoring came in their own half of the sixth, when they put runners at first and third with two outs. 

Hesseltine, however, got some defensive help by fellow Maloney grad Max Giacco, who made a diving catch at second base to end the top of the sixth inning and keep the game tied.

The Expos then proceeded to score the winning runs in the bottom half when Hendrickson turned around a hanging curveball and launched a no-doubter well over the left field fence.

“I was sitting on a curveball up,” said Hendrickson, who took over the coaching duties from Hesseltine this season. “He’d thrown it to me both times I was up, so I was sitting on that and put a good swing on it.”

Back to Hesseltine. Before pitching in the minor leagues, the lefty threw for the Meriden Merchants after his days at Maloney. A mainstay of the Expos since the team’s inception, Hesseltine remains a part of this season’s 1-2 pitching punch with J.D. Tyler.

Sporting a few grey hairs in his beard these days, Hesseltine has combined with Tyler for six of the Expos’ eight wins so far this season.

“It makes it so easy when he’s on,” Hendrickson said of Hesseltine. “When all his pitches are working, he makes things so easy on everybody.

“Today everything was working for him and he was hitting spots,” Hendrickson added. “He was on his game today.”

2023 Stadium Series 4 Hartford PAL GHTBL Charity Event Dunkin' Park

Stadium Series 4 Hartford PAL

This season all 8 GHTBL teams will play benefit games to fundraise for the Hartford Police Athletic League at Dunkin’ Park. Bat raffles and concessions will be available at our Stadium Series 4 Hartford PAL:

Dunkin’ Park, 1214 Main St, Hartford, CT 06103

CLICK HERE to DONATE or to BUY TICKETS

For the seventh consecutive summer, GHTBL will go to bat for the local community. This year the Hartford Police Athletic League will be benefactors. Hartford PAL empowers the youth of Hartford to realize their greatest potential through mentoring, sports, education and a positive relationship with police officers. Learn more about this wonderful organization by visiting: https://www.hartfordpal.org.

All 4 Games at Dunkin’ Park presented by ProBats:

July 12 – 6 PM: Rainbow Graphics @ M&T Bank

July 12 – 8 PM: East Hartford Jets @ Middletown Mets

Jul 13 – 6 PM: Record-Journal Expos @ Bristol Greeners

Jul 13 – 8 PM: South Windsor Phillies @ Vernon Orioles

Concessions will be open!

Here are the results from GHTBL’s previous benefit games at Dunkin’ Park:

2017: $5,641 to Hartford’s Camp Courant

2018: $4,500 to Connecticut Children’s

2019: $7,000 to MS 4 MS

2020: $2,000 to Colt Park Friends and Foundation

2021: $5,624 to Connecticut Cancer Foundation

2022: $5,035 to Sandy Hook Promise

2023: $??? to Hartford PAL

Visit www.givebutter.com/hartfordpal to buy tickets or donate.

Be there for the kids! Together we are helping contribute to Hartford PAL and to the well-being of children and families in Hartford.

Make a donation at www.givebutter.com/hartfordpal. If not today, then we will see you at Dunkin’ Park on July 12 & 13!

CLICK HERE to DONATE or to BUY TICKETS

Share Fundraiser

IMGP0021Costanza (2)

With Smoke Set to Subside, Graphics Lead League Undefeated

The Rainbow Graphics franchise of Manchester have begun the 2023 Regular Season in near perfect form. They’ve been scorching opposing pitching so far and now sit atop the GHTBL standings at 6-0. The Graphics will seek to continue their hot play as the Canadian wildfire smoke subsides. Air quality standards have been determined to be playable and Rainbow Graphics will host the East Hartford Jets tonight at 7:00 PM at Northwest Park, Manchester.

The Graphics have managed to strike a balance between veteran players in their prime and rookie players contributing from the get-go. Some of their more experienced names have taken league leaderboards by storm: Travis Salois, Edison Galan, Tyler Repoli and Eric Anderson. First-timers like Dan Orzech and Matt Costanza have proven to be solid additions as regulars in the lineup and especially on defense.

Meanwhile, around the league, there are two other undefeated teams: Record-Journal Expos and M&T Bank. At least one of the three remaining no-loss teams will end their winning streak because the Expos and Bankers will face off at Wethersfield High School tonight at 6:00 PM. Even though four teams (Mets, Greeners, Orioles and Phillies) are mired at the bottom of the standings, plenty of their losses have been by two runs or less.

It should be another exciting season. As always, the GHTBL is proud to feature and promote some of the best amateur ballplayers in the State of Connecticut. With longtime veterans, former professionals, high school prospects and with so many new talents added to the league this year, the future is bright for twilight baseball in Greater Hartford.

To players: please do your best to keep your cool when you take issue with taunting by opposing players or when you disagree with an umpire’s call. The league needs to maintain a working relationship with umpires and we must show them respect. Like it or not, GHTBL players reflect the character of the league. It’s in our best interest to keep our good reputation in tact. Everyone should act appropriately, even when it’s the hard thing to do – out of respect for each other, opponents and fans of all ages. Sportsmanship still matters.

The league extends a sincere thank you to players and contributors who are representing the league well day in and day out. The season is going very well thanks to so many of you. Be well and have a great summer! -Weston Ulbrich, League Secretary

NEXT GHTBL EVENT: JULY 12 & 13, 2023 – STADIUM SERIES 4 HARTFORD PAL

Cooper Johnson Adelphi Baseball GHTBL M&T Bank

Cooper Johnson, Third Generation Twilight Player

For the last five years, Cooper Johnson of Newington, Connecticut, has played at Adelphi University in Garden City, New York. The center fielder has recently committed to M&T Bank for the upcoming 2023 GHTBL season as a third generation player. He will be joining the same franchise as his father, Mike Johnson, who played with Tom Abbruzzese’s Bank Boston team in the 1990’s. Cooper’s grandfather Rollie Johnson was a GHTBL Hall of Fame inductee and a significant figure in professional scouting. Here are some of Cooper’s individual accolades coming into the GHTBL as a first-year player:

  • NE10 Academic Honor Roll – Academic Distinction
  • NE10 Academic Honor Roll – Academic Honors
  • Walked-off a win on his birthday (11th inning) w/ RBI single vs. Saint Rose in NE10 Tournament
Cooper Johnson Adelphi Baseball GHTBL M&T Bank 2
Cooper Johnson (left), Adelphi Baseball, 2023.

Cooper’s grandfather, Roland “Rollie” Johnson was a scout for more than 40 years, including 30 year with the New York Mets. He initially scouted for the St. Louis Cardinals from 1973 to 1982. Rollie served as director of scouting for the Mets from 1986 to 1992. Rollie also co-authored influential baseball books – The Baseball Encyclopedia (1969) and The Sports Encyclopedia: Baseball (1974).

During Johnson’s tenure as Director of Scouting with the Mets, there were several notable draft picks including Todd Hundley in 1987. Johnson also remembers drafting Curtis Pride on the recommendation of an area scout. Pride was 95% deaf, but a great athlete, and a greater individual.”

SABR Bio Project, Rollie Johnson by Alan Cohen
1964 Rollie Johnson Paces Twilight Loop
Rollie Johnson Paces Twilight Loop, 1964

Rollie had the rare opportunity to draft his son, Mike Johnson, in the 42nd round of the 1993 MLB Draft. Mike suited up for the New York Mets organization at Rookie ball in Kingsport. He was promoted to low and high Single-A the following year, but Mike’s professional career came to end shortly thereafter.

In 1990, Rollie earned an induction into the GHTBL Hall of Fame in the Players Division. He was a Trinity College graduate who began twi-loop ball in 1961 as a catcher for the East Hartford Merchants. Then he played for a team known as Landerman Orchestras – sponsored by Hartford’s most well known musicians of their era, Paul and Maurice Landerman. Rollie joined the Hartford Orioles in the summer of 1963. Rollie he finished his twilight career with Moriarty Brothers in 1973.

(Aside: the Rollie Johnson family is unrelated to Gene Johnson’s family.)

1975 Head for Baseball Camp Rollie Johnson St. Thomas Seminary
Rollie Johnson heads baseball camp at St. Thomas Seminary, 1975.

Rollie was a veritable baseball junkie. After publishing two books, he was hired away from the Twilight League by the St. Louis Cardinals. From there Rollie enjoyed a marvelous scouting career. He was bestowed with the A.B. “Turk” Karam Award in 1998 and was later elected to the Professional Scouts Hall of Fame in 2009.

1990 Twilight Inductions GHTBL Hall of Fame
GHTBL Hall of Fame inductions, 1990.
Rollie Johnson GHTBL Baseball Scout
Rollie Johnson (1940-2022)
2023 GHTBL Tribute to Gary Zavatkay

Gary Zavatkay, A Baseball Life

An excerpt published in the Hartford Courant on Apr. 16, 2023:

Gary was raised in Torrington and graduated from Torrington High School, class of 1979, where he was recognized as an all-star baseball and basketball player. Following high school, Gary received a “full ride” baseball scholarship to the University of New Haven where he started at third base all four years for the UNH Chargers and compiled such strong statistics that he was inducted into the UNH Sports Hall of Fame in 2000. To date, he ranks eighth in career RBIs (126) and recently fell out of the top-10 for all-time home runs.

In 1981, Gary played for the Harwich Mariners of the prestigious Cape Cod Baseball League and was named to the All-Region and All-New England Collegiate Conference in 1983. After graduation, his love for baseball continued and he played numerous seasons (1983-1988) on the Society for Savings team in the Greater Hartford Twilight Baseball League all while continuing his education earning his MBA from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Hartford Campus.

Professionally, Gary leveraged the leadership skills he learned on the field and built a successful career as a National Account Manager for several industrial organizations such as J.M. NEY Company, Curtis Industries, and Barnes Distribution. In addition to his full-time job, he went on to have a prolific career as a women’s basketball official at the Division I, II, and III collegiate level, ultimately getting to spend time on the court refereeing teams of the Atlantic 10, Ivy League, American East and MAAC conferences.

In his personal life, Gary was an avid runner having completed the Boston Marathon and too many road races to count, namely the Litchfield Road Race, an annual occurrence with a large group of his friends and family in attendance. Over time, golf became his passion and something he enjoyed regularly with friends and family. He was a member of Indian Hill Country Club as well as Suffield Country Club where you would find him weekly trying to improve his game. We will always remember the many years filled with laughter on and off the course annually sponsoring what became known as the ZAV OPEN. Although Gary’s time with us was cut short, his memory will live on in the hearts of all who knew him for years to come.

For Gary’s full obituary go to: https://www.legacy.com/us/obituaries/hartfordcourant/name/gary-zavatkay-obituary?id=51601640

2020 Pat Barnett Vernon Orioles Pitcher GHTBL

Preview: Opening Day & GHTBL’s 2023 Season

On Tuesday, May 23, 2023, the GHTBL will open its 94th season for local amateurs, student-athletes, ex-professionals and prospects. Wood bats will start cracking on Opening Day with a 6 PM matchup at Frank J. McCoy Field in Vernon between the veteran Vernon Orioles and the Manchester-based Rainbow Graphics. Jason Valliere, a longtime contributor to the Tri-County Legion program will assume in-game duties as Head Coach for Rainbow Graphics this season.

It will be anyone’s guess as to which players, new or old, will make an impact on Opening Day. One might think it would be the players fresh off their college season, but it would be a mistake to overlook experience. Dan Trubia and Tony Trubia of the O’s and Evan Chamberlain of Graphics have nearly 60 years of combined experience of twilight ball. At the same time, it will be interesting to see how rookie players will fare for both teams and throughout the league.

The second game of Opening Day will begin at 7 PM at Rotary Field in South Windsor. The Meriden-based Record-Journal Expos will play the South Windsor Phillies under the lights at one of Greater Hartford’s most unsung baseball diamonds. You’d be hard-pressed to find any player who doesn’t enjoy playing at Rotary Field.

A core group for Manager Ron Pizzanello and the South Windsor Phillies since forming in 2018 has included Aedin Wadja, Jake Petrozza, Patrick McMahon and a few others returning in 2023. AJ Hendrickson, 2022 GHTBL MVP, has stepped into the Expos manager role in place of Charlie Hesseltine, who had served as manager since 2017. Hesseltine has been a dominant pitcher for Meriden since 2004 and will continue to pitch for the team this year.

Over in East Hartford, the 3X Playoff Champion Jets will take flight on Thursday, May 25 at home against their main foe, the Vernon Orioles. O’s Manager Jack Ceppetelli will square off against the Jets and their newly re-appointed Manager Chris Kehoe. Both Ceppetelli and Kehoe are the most tenured GHTBL contributors behind Tom Abbruzzese – who is going into his 48th year as manager of the “Bankers” franchise – now named M&T Bank.

There is however, a newcomer in charge of the recently consolidated Middletown Mets. A sixteen year old named Ryan Ruggiero of Xavier High School will become the youngest manager to lead a GHTBL team. As an Assistant Coach for the Hartford Colts in 2022, Ruggiero welcomed the opportunity and the idea of moving the franchise to Middletown – a closer location for its players and an upgraded home field with Palmer Field and Buzzy Levin Field. Fixtures for the Mets are expected to be Albertus Magnus standout Sean Jefferson and former Keene State right-hander Alex Koletar on the mound.

The Bristol Greeners are entering their third GHTBL season and have managed to book one of Connecticut’s best ballparks, Muzzy Field, for a majority of their home games. They return under the direction of another young manager, Trevor Mays, in his second year at the helm. New additions to the Greeners will include Gabe Zamorano Jr., a freshman at University of St. Joseph and Robert Bibisi, a graduate of Utica University.

Last but not least, M&T Bank are once again expected to have the league’s best left side of the infield: former professional Willy Yahn at shortstop and Eastern Connecticut’s Brendan Lynch at third base. Along with a contingency of players from Elms College, Tom Abbruzzese seeks to regain his title-winning ways in a new sublimated, double-sided, M&T Bank uniform.

Note: a new uniform rule will take effect this season as voted on by GHTBL managers. Any player out of uniform (wrong jersey, wrong hat, different color pants, etc.) will earn their team a $50 league fine.

On behalf of President Holowaty, thank you to all of our league sponsors, fans, families, spouses and friends who support the twilight league!

2019 Buzzy Levin Field Middletown Baseball

Four Fields Named After Twilight Hall of Famers

Did you know? The following four ballparks are named after longtime GHTBL players, coaches, team sponsors and GHTBL Hall of Fame inductees:

1. Matthew M. Moriarty Field at Mt. Nebo park in Manchester, Connecticut – dedicated in 1975:

2. Ray McKenna Field at McAuliffe Park in East Hartford, Connecticut – dedicated in 1984:

3. Frank J. McCoy Field at Henry Park in Vernon, Connecticut – dedicated in 2010:

4. Buzzy Levin Field at Pat Kidney Sports Complex in Middletown, Connecticut – dedicated in 2018:

2023 GHTBL Winter Workout D Bat Bloomfield ProBats

Workout #3 on April 20th at 7 PM

On Thursday, April 20, 2023, at 7:00 PM, GHTBL will hold another off-season workout at D-Bat Bloomfield located at 62 Douglas St, Bloomfield, Connecticut.

New players and GHTBL alumni are invited to attend this hitting and pitching session. Cages have been rented and we expect live pitching to take place towards the end of the workout. D-Bat Bloomfield’s Zach Risedorf and Willy Yahn will be in attendance to offer instruction.

  • Each participating player is asked to pay $10 (either cash or Venmo) at D-Bat Bloomfield on the night of the workout.
  • GHTBL’s official bat sponsor, ProBats will also be in attendance to demo and sell wood bats.
  • Please RSVP by messaging the league on one of our social media accounts or by emailing us at Contact@GHTBL.org.
2023 GHTBL Winter Workout Bloomfield Connecticut

Winter Workout #2 on March 23rd at 7 PM

On Thursday, March 23, 2023, at 7:00 PM, GHTBL will hold a Winter Workout at D-Bat Bloomfield (located at 62 Douglas St, Bloomfield, Connecticut). New players and GHTBL alumni are invited to attend this hitting and pitching session. Four cages have been rented and we expect live pitching to take place towards the end of the workout. D-Bat Bloomfield’s Zach Risedorf and Willy Yahn will be in attendance to offer instruction and tips.

  • Each participating player is asked to pay $10 (either cash or Venmo) at D-Bat Bloomfield on the night of the workout.
  • GHTBL’s official bat sponsor, ProBats will also be in attendance to demo and sell wood bats.
  • Please RSVP by messaging the league on one of our social media accounts or by emailing us at Contact@GHTBL.org.
Leo Bravakis Umpire GHTBL

The Passing of Hall of Famer Leo Bravakis Jr.

Leo James Bravakis, Jr., 79, of Windsor Locks, passed away peacefully on Saturday, March 4, 2023. He was born on July 26, 1943, in Middletown, CT, to Doris (Ahern) and Leo J. Bravakis, Sr.

Leo attended Middletown High School (1961), completed undergraduate studies at the University of Connecticut (1965), and received his Master of Education from the University of Hartford (1970). Leo earned varsity letters in football, basketball, and baseball in high school. In 1960, he was awarded the Thom McAn football MVP Trophy and as quarterback, led his team to a 7-2-1 record. Leo was also a two-year starter in hoops. Baseball was where Leo excelled. He was co-captain of the 1961 Middletown High Tigers who were the Connecticut Valley Conference Co-Champions and ranked #1 in the Class M CIAC Tournament with a 19-1 record. Leo recorded 121 strikeouts in 76 innings of work. He received the prestigious Sal Mazzotta Award given annually to the best all-around senior athlete who has demonstrated proficiency in scholarship and citizenship. Leo was inducted into the Middletown Hall of Fame in 2002.

1961 Central Valley Conference All Star Team Connecticut
Central Valley Conference All Star Team, Connecticut, 1961.

Leo pitched four years for the UConn Huskies, tossed a no-hitter as a freshman and was a key pitcher on the 1965 College World Series squad that only gave up 66 hits in 254 innings. During the deciding series versus Holy Cross at Fenway Park, Leo hit a double off the famous Green Monster. At the CWS, Leo pitched in relief and got a hit in UConn’s victory over Lafayette. His senior year, Leo received the “C’ Ring, an award for excellence in athletics, scholarship, citizenship, and leadership. As a proud Husky alum, Leo was a member of the UConn Dugout Club.

1962 UConns Leo Bravakis Pitches No Hitter
UConn’s Leo Bravakis Pitches No-Hitter, 1962.

After college, Leo pitched in the Middlesex County and Hartford Twilight Leagues before an arm injury ended his career. Leo finished with a 27-9 record in the Hartford Twilight League and was inducted into the GHTBL Hall of Fame in 1997 as pitcher.

After his athletic playing career ended, Leo turned to officiating soccer and umpiring baseball. Leo was considered to be one of the state’s best in both sports. Leo worked 15 state soccer tournament title games – 8 girls and 7 boys finals-and worked 18 state baseball tournament title games. He served on the soccer officials and baseball umpires committee boards. He was President of the soccer association from 1983-1985 and was President of the Connecticut Board of Approved Umpires twice. He served as the Commissioner for the Hartford Chapter of the Connecticut Board of Approved Umpires. Leo received the 1981 Central Connecticut Soccer Officials Association Bernard O’Rourke Distinguished Service Award and also was conferred lifetime membership for his years of dedicated service. Leo was inducted as a charter member into the Connecticut Girls Soccer Coaches Hall of Fame in 2003 for officiating.

1964 Leo Bravakis Jr. UConn Baseball
Leo Bravakis Jr. UConn, 1964.

Leo was a math teacher for East Windsor Public Schools from 1965-2001. He coached girls’ basketball and baseball at East Windsor High School. His baseball teams had a record of 89-69 winning league titles twice. He coached his son Sean’s Windsor Locks American Legion baseball team for three summers.

When he retired from coaching, Leo served as the athletic director at East Windsor High School for ten years. During his tenure, Leo was instrumental in bringing about changes that have made girls’ basketball one of the most respected and valued sports in Connecticut.

He served as the President of the East Windsor Education Association and was on the East Windsor Athletic Club Hall of Fame nominating committee. He was a member of the Connecticut Association of Athletic Directors Executive Board and a member of the CIAC Girls’ Basketball Committee for five years. In 2000, Leo received Central Connecticut Board No. 6 of Approved Basketball Officials Commissioner’s Award. Leo was inducted into the East Windsor Athletic Club Hall of Fame in 2006.

1965 Carolyn M. MacCarthy Bravakis Wedding Photo
Carolyn (MacCarthy) Bravakis, 1965.

Leo and his wife Carolyn enjoyed visiting various North American cities plus venturing abroad to Prague, Paris, Rome, London (2012 Olympics), Barcelona and taking the Rhine Cruise and Baltic Tour.

Leo, a devoted fan of UConn’s basketball programs, held season tickets for games both in Storrs and Hartford. He enjoyed watching sports on TV. An avid golfer, Leo was a member of Tallwood Country Club in Hebron, CT, for decades and won numerous club championships. He loved his visits with his three grandchildren and enjoyed following their pursuits.

Leo enjoyed raising many a glass of adult beverages with his numerous friends. With Leo you always knew where you stood; he loved a spirited debate about anything. He once proudly stated “I am not politically correct, I am Leo correct.” Leo was a one-of-a-kind character who made an impression on everyone he met.

1975 Bristol American Legion vs. Middletown Legion Leo Bravakis Sr. Umpire
Bristol American Legion vs. Middletown Legion with Umpire Leo Bravakis Jr, 1975.

He leaves behind his high school sweetheart and beloved wife of 57 years, Carolyn McCarthy Bravakis; his son Sean Emmett Bravakis and his wife Rebecca; grandchildren Emmett, Isabelle, and Timothy Bravakis. He is survived by his sister, Alice Hodge and her husband Richard; niece Leigh Hodge Fischer and her husband Sean; nephew James Hodge and his wife Dawn; and Christopher Hodge and his wife Heather; his brother-in-law Dr. Robert E. McCarthy; nieces Katharine, Christine, and Coreen McCarthy. Leo was predeceased by his parents and sister-in-law Sandra McCarthy. Leo’s family would like to extend heartfelt appreciation to the ICU Team at St. Francis Hospital for making his last days comfortable. Special recognition to Doctors Sudhanshu Mulay, Paul B. Murray and Alan Soroka for their extraordinary care, compassion, and kindness to Leo over the year

Leo Bravakis Jr.

A time of visitation for family and friends will be held on Monday, March 13, 2023, from 4-7 p.m. at the Carmon Windsor Funeral Home, 807 Bloomfield Ave., Windsor. His funeral service will be held privately. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions can be made in Leo’s name to the East Windsor Athletic Club, c/o Ted Szymanski, 166 Rockville Road, Windsorville, CT 06016 and the UConn Baseball Stadium Enhancement Fund, c/o Jim Penders, Head Baseball Coach, 2095 Hillside Road, Unit 1173, Storrs, CT 06269. To leave an online message of condolence for his family, please visit www.carmonfuneralhome.com.

Published by Hartford Courant on Mar. 9, 2023.

The Royal Typewriter Baseball Club of Hartford

Back when most manufacturing companies organized baseball clubs, one of the longest running teams in the Nutmeg State was Royal Typewriter. In 1908, Royal Typewriter had moved their production operations from Brooklyn, New York, to New Park Avenue on Hartford’s western border. Along with their crosstown rival, Underwood Typewriter Company, Royal’s relocation made Hartford the “Typewriter Capital of the World.” That same year, Royal Typewriter Baseball Club joined the city’s lively amateur scene. Ownership built a baseball diamond on New Park Avenue, they supplied uniforms and equipment, and the Royals became a powerhouse in Hartford for about four decades.

1908 Royals vs. Criterions Hartford, CT
Royals vs. Criterions, 1908.
1908 Royal Typewriter Standard
No. 1 “Flatbed” Desktop Royal Typewriter, 1908.
City Championship, Royals vs. Echoes, Hartford, CT, 1909.
City Championship, Hartford, CT, 1909.
No. 1 "Flatbed" Desktop Royal Typewriter, 1909.
No. 1 “Flatbed” Desktop Royal Typewriter, 1909.
1909 Jul 17 Royal Typewriter vs. Hartford Rubber Works
Royal Typewriter vs. Hartford Rubber Works, 1909.

Key players on Royal Typewriter were young, local workmen. A tall right-handed pitcher named Moses “Moe” Lenhoff from Ashley Street was the team’s ace. Lenhoff enjoyed minor league experience with New Britain of the Connecticut State League and later with Amsterdam of the Eastern Association. His Royal battery mate was John “Boggy” Muldoon of West Hartford, a catcher who later signed with the Hartford Senators of the Eastern League at 20 years old. Following a semi-pro career, in which he caught a game for Babe Ruth, Muldoon became Connecticut’s best known umpire. He later retired from Royal Typewriter after 42 years of service.

Moses Lenhoff, Pitcher, Royal Typewriter, 1911.
Moses Lenhoff, Pitcher, Royal Typewriter, 1911.
Battery of Royal Baseball Team, 1911.
Muldoon, Lenhoff & Andrews, Royal Typewriter, 1911.
1912 Royal Typewriter Baseball Club
Marty Cleary, Eddie Johnson, Al Miller & Ed Horan, Royal Typewriter, 1912.
1912 Royal Typewriter Ad Hartford Courant
Royal Typewriter advertisement, Hartford Courant, 1912.

Royal Typewriter were revered as one of Hartford’s top company teams. The manager of the club was A.A. MacKay, recognized as “Father Baseball” by his players. In 1913, the Royals were chosen to represent the city in the newly arranged Connecticut Independent Baseball League by Hartford sporting goods purveyor and community organizer, Harry N. Anderson. Other cities included Manchester, Meriden, Wallingford, Bristol, New Britain, Windsor Locks and Collinsville. For a company team, Royal Typewriter was elite, but as semi-professionals the Royals of Hartford finished fourth in the standings in consecutive seasons.

1913 Anderson Royal Typewriter Baseball Club
H.M. Anderson, Royal Typewriter, 1913.
Royal Typewriter players, 1913.
Joe Burke, Bill Dwyer & Squizzer Pillion, Royal Typewriter, 1913.
Royal Typewriter Baseball Club, 1919.
Royal Typewriter Baseball Club, 1919.

On October 9, 1926, the Hartford Daily Courant reported that Royal made its one millionth typewriter. The thriving business remained active in local baseball. Thousands of fans had witnessed the Royals perform after work hours. However, public interest in company teams waned due the impending Great Depression. Unemployment made sports less of a priority in Hartford. Crowds of 5,000 at Royal games were now reduced to a few hundred Hartford Industrial League diehards.

Royal Typewriter factories, New Park Avenue Hartford, CT, 1930.
Royal Typewriter factories, New Park Avenue, Hartford, CT, 1930.
1934 Industrial League Standings
Hartford Industrial League standings, 1934.
1935 c. Royal Typewriter Hartford
Royal Typewriter, Hartford, CT, 1935.
1935 Apr 27 Royal Typewriter Frank A. Strong Manager
Royal Typewriter seek opponents, 1935.

Royal Typewriter finally hit their stride as a baseball franchise in the late 1930’s. They finished second in the Industrial League of 1937 under the direction of Manager Frank Strong. The next year, Royal Typewriter defeated Chance Vought and captured the “Dusty” League title with a perfect 15-0 win-loss record. Many Royals on the 1938 championship team such as Pete Kapura, George Dixon, John Carlin, Yosh Kinel and Jackie Cronin were savvy veterans with plenty of diamond time. They also appeared for the Savitt Gems, Bill Savitt’s semi-professional club at Hartford’s Bulkeley Stadium.

1936 Bulkeley Stadium Industrial League
President K.C. Faustman & Vice President C.B. Cook of Royal Typewriter Co., 1936.
1936 Royal Typewriter Baseball Club Hartford
Royal Typewriter Baseball Club, 1936.
Frank A. Strong, Charles Shimkus, Thomas Reilly and Andrew Jack, Hartford Industrial League, 1937.
Frank A. Strong, Charles Shimkus, Thomas Reilly & Andrew Jack, Hartford Industrial League, 1937.
1938 Royal Typewriter Hartford
Royal Typewriter Baseball Club, 1938.
1938 Royal Typewriter Defeat Chance Vought to Finish Unbeaten
Royal Typewriter defeat Chance Vought to finish season unbeaten, Hartford Courant, 1938.
1938 Royal Typewriter Defeat Chance Vought to Finish Unbeaten Box Score
Royal Typewriter vs. Chance Vought, July 28, 1938.

Manager Strong guided the Royals to another winning season in 1939. They were runner-ups in the Dusty League behind Pratt & Whitney, but the Royals bounced back when they competed for a statewide “Connecticut Semi-Pro Baseball Championship” against the Bridgeport Springwoods. Because Bridgeport defeated Pratt & Whitney a few days earlier, the Royals secured the semi-pro state championship with a 3-2 win over Bridgeport. A week later, the Royals faced Rhode Island’s state champion, Club Marquette of Woonsocket, but were swept three games in row.

1939 Royal Typewriter Co. Win Connecticut Semi-Pro Baseball Championship
Royal Typewriter wins Connecticut Semi-Pro Baseball Championship, 1939.
1939 Aug 19 Royal Typewriter Charlie Adamick Umpire John Muldoon
Umpire John “Boggy” Muldoon rules out Charlie Adamick, Royal Typewriter, August 19, 1939.

Royal Typewriter underwent immense changes during World War II. The company converted all operations to exclusively manufacture goods for the Allied cause. Royal made machine guns, rifles, bullets, propellers and spare parts for airplane engines. When the war ended, Royal Typewriter sponsored a team in the Hartford Twilight League. At the end of the summer, Royal hosted the Pete Kapura Memorial Doubleheader. Kapura, a longtime Royal employee, died at 35 years old at Saint Francis Hospital due to an undisclosed illness. On August 11, 1947, Kapura’s wife and two children were supported by more than 3,000 paying fans at Bulkeley Stadium.

1941 Jun 13 Pratt-Whitney Machine Tops Royal Typewriter
Pratt & Whitney Machine tops Royal Typewriter, June 13, 1941.
Jon Cordier & Ed Roche, Royal Typewriter, Hartford Twilight League, 1947.
L to R: Ernie Hutt, Walt Fonfara, John Buikus & Nonny Zazzaro, Royal Typewriter, Hartford Twilight League, Colt Park, Hartford, CT, 1947.
Royal Typewriter alumni at Hallbach's Restaurant, Meriden, CT, 1951.
Royal Typewriter alumni at Hallbach’s Restaurant, Meriden, CT, 1951.
1955 Jaycee Courant Heublein A 1 Aces vs. Royal Typewriter
Heublein A-1 Aces vs. Royal Typewriter, Jaycee Courant, Hartford, 1955.
Umpire Boggy Muldoon retires from Royal Typewriter Co. after 42 years, 1958.
John “Boggy” Muldoon retires from Royal Typewriter Co. after 42 years, 1958.

Sources

1. Hartford Courant

2. Record-Journal

Eleven Big Names Inducted to Hall of Fame

On Saturday, November 5, 2022, the GHTBL Hall of Fame Committee organized a night to remember at Indian Hill Country Club in Newington, Connecticut. Eleven new inductees were officially honored and inducted as the Hall of Fame’s Class of 2022. Here’s the list of players (and one manager) who earned the league’s highest honor:

Scott Cormier
Mike Schweighoffer
Jim Snediker
Brian Marshall
Roberto Giansiracusa
Jason Maule
Jeff Johnson
Brett Burnham
Todd Mercier
Kevin Gieras
Thomas Abbruzzese

Congratulations to all inductees! Special thank you GHTBL Hall of Fame Committee, its President Steve Krajewski and Jack Hurley for your diligent efforts.

Nov. 5: Hall of Fame Dinner

On Saturday, November 5, 2022, the GHTBL Hall of Fame will officially honor ten new inductees. Tickets can be purchased in advance.

VENUE: Indian Hill Country Club, 111 Golf Street, Newington, Connecticut

TIME: 5:30 PM Check-in, Dinner at 6:30 PM, Ceremony at 7:00 PM

COST: $50 per person

PURCHASE TICKETS: Make checks payable to “ORIOLE BASEBALL ASSOCIATION” and send to:

Steve Krajewski
61 Thrall Road
Vernon, CT 06066

DEADLINE: Friday, November 1, 2022

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact GHTBL Hall of Fame President, Steve Krajewski at (860) 815-7121 or email krashtrip7@gmail.com.

Here’s the list of GHTBL Hall of Fame Inductees for the Class of 2022:

  1. Scott Cormier
  2. Mike Schweighoffer
  3. Jim Snediker
  4. Brian Marshall
  5. Roberto Giansiracusa
  6. Jason Maule
  7. Jeff Johnson
  8. Brett Burnham
  9. Todd Mercier
  10. Kevin Gieras

See you on November 5th!

Jack Hurley (left) announces 2022 GHTBL Hall of Fame Inductees Brian Marshall, Jim Snediker, Mike Schweighoffer and Scott Cormier at Dunkin’ Donuts Park.

Learn more about the GHTBL Hall of Fame by clicking here.

Remembering Allan Garray, an All-Time Great

Last year, GHTBL Hall of Fame inductee Allan Garray passed away. His involvement in the Twi-loop spanned three decades. Garray’s baseball career first began as a promising catcher at Nonnewaug High School in Andover, Connecticut. He matriculated to UConn Avery Point and set the school record for batting average (.536 in 1976). Then he transferred up to the University of Connecticut for three seasons (1977-79).

1977 University of Connecticut Baseball Team

Garray excelled at UConn under Head Coach, Larry Panciera and became a formidable catcher with help from Assistant Coach, Andy Baylock. He was a starter for the Huskies’ first College World Series run in 1979. Garray posted a .291 career batting average at Storrs. In the summer months, he played in the Cape Cod Baseball League. After a spectacular college campaign, he was drafted by the Kansas City Royals in the 34th round of the 1979 MLB Draft.

Allan Garray, University of Connecticut, 1979.

Garray caught in the Gulf Coast League and in the South Atlantic League, however, a fastball to the eye was said to have ended his professional career. In 1982, he appeared in an all-star game against the GHTBL with the Waterbury Twi-Met league and was recruited by GHTBL’s Tom Abbruzzese. With Garray behind the plate in 1983, Abbruzzese’s Society for Savings club claimed the pennant. In five summers with the “Bankers” Garray batted .338 with 23 home runs and 98 RBI. He won two Season Titles, two Playoff Championships and the 1985 Bud Mahon Award for Most Valuable Player.

Hartford Courant excerpt, June 29, 1986.

In 1994, Garray founded the New England SportsPlex in Vernon, Connecticut. It was a 14-acre complex made up of softball fields, volleyball courts and horseshoe pits. That same year, he was inducted into the GHTBL Hall of Fame by its director, Jack Repass. The recognition may have convinced Garray to make a comeback to the diamond. At 38 years old Garray joined up with Gene Johnson’s Newman Lincoln-Mercury franchise (previously known as Moriarty Brothers).

Hartford Courant excerpt, April 23, 1994.

As Newman’s Designated Hitter, Garray captured a GHTBL Playoff Championship in 1997 and back-to-back Season Titles in 1999 and 2000. Then he was honored as an inductee of the UConn Avery Point Athletic Hall of Fame in 2001. He continued to play locally while operating a pension consulting firm in Rocky Hill. Garray was an avid “Sunday leaguer” who competed in the Over 30 World Series and Over 40 World Series. He also served as an umpire for amateur loops throughout the state.

Allan Garray, Umpire, Palmer Field, Middletown, CT, 1998.

Allan Garay returned to the GHTBL yet again in 2004, establishing Monaco Ford, an expansion team out of Glastonbury, Connecticut. The club briefly fielded Major League slugger AJ Pollock during the summer of 2008. Baseball talent seemed to flock to Allan Garray, a lifelong contributor to the GHTBL and one the league’s all-time catchers. The league sends our best to Allan’s family and friends.

Allan Garray

We play because we love the game.

Allan Garray

Vernon Orioles Going To Bat For Community

The Vernon Orioles have continued their community involvement this year.

Chris Dehnel, Patch Staff

VERNON, CT — At a recent game, the Vernon Oriole family had Carol Hartmann throw out the ceremonial first pitch to remember and honor her son Brenden Mailloux, an outstanding Rockville baseball player.

In 2010, the Hartmann family lost a beloved family member, Brenden. He was was the son of Carol Hartmann and Len Mailloux, and grandson of Russell Hartmann of the beloved Hartmann’s Supermarket in town. Brenden died unexpectedly in 2010.

The family wanted to do something in Brenden’s memory and felt that contributing to improvements to McCoy Field, known as the Home of the Vernon Orioles, was a fitting choice to honor Brenden and benefit current and future ball players.

Carol Hartmann throws out the first pitch, McCoy Field, 2022.

Brenden grew up playing baseball from Little League to All-Stars, to JC Courant League, Rockville High School Varsity, and American Legion. He was a skilled player and loved the game. His special talent was his glove at first base. He played many games on McCoy field.

The Family is thrilled that the Vernon Orioles and other teams are benefitting from the improvements made. The outfield was named as the Brenden Mailloux Alley, which is located on the scoreboard.

“The Vernon Orioles Family would like to thank the Hartmann Family for their generous donation. McCoy Field is one of the premier fields in the league,” Orioles officials said [led by Manager Jack Ceppetelli, Kevin Powell and Steve Krajewski].

Brendan Mailloux Alley at McCoy Field, Vernon, CT.

The Vernon Orioles Family remembered and honored a fellow Oriole, Steve Czyz by having his daughter Kat throw the Ceremonial first pitch against Rainbow Graphics. Steve played shortstop for the Orioles from 1993 to 2000. In that time, he played on two championship teams, 1996 and 1999. He was also named to numerous All-Star teams throughout his career.

Steve grew up in Ellington and played for Ellington High School’s baseball team. He then went on to play college ball at Western New England. Steve died in 2015 at age 44. The Orioles donate each year to the Steve Czyz Scholarship Fund that goes to an Ellington High School student.

In April of this year, the Orioles made Kat Czyz, an honorary Vernon Oriole. Kat is a sophomore at Ellington High School, plays softball and has led the Knights to the NCCC Championship. She plays for the CT Bomber Travel Team, coaches an Ellington Little League team and plays Volleyball for Ellington High School.

Honorary Vernon Oriole, Kat Czyz throws out first pitch.

Original article: https://patch.com/connecticut/vernon/vernon-orioles-going-bat-community

Managers Pick 2022 GHTBL All-Star Team

GHTBL is pleased to announce the top Twi-loop players from our 2022 campaign. League managers from every franchise have recently convened to vote on the GHTBL All-Star team. This season, 25 players have been selected. These All-Stars have been invited to participate in an interleague matchup against the Connecticut Twilight League All-Stars on Friday, August 19, 2022, at Muzzy Field in Bristol, Connecticut. At 6:00 PM there will be a Home Run Derby featuring GHTBL and CTL players. Then, around 7:30 PM, the All-Star Game will commence.

Congratulations to the following players on being named 2022 GHTBL All-Stars:

Cardinals
Evan Wilkinson, OF (9)
Colts
Dan Livingston, P (9)
Nick Landell, SS (5)
Nick Flammia, OF (7)
Expos
Justin Marks, P/OF (7)
AJ Hendrickson, P/C/OF (9)
Will Kszywanos, 1B (7)
Graphics
Ryan Callanan, P (5)
Evan Chamberlain, P/3B (9)
Dan Steiner, C (5)
Greeners
AJ Lorenzetti, C/OF (5)
Jets
Bryan Albee, P (9)
Jim Schult, P/OF (9)
Corey Plasky, 2B (7)
Nate Viera, 3B (5)
Jeff Criscuolo, SS (8)
Orioles
Matt Curtis, P (7)
Matt Cleveland, P (9)
Tony Trubia, SS (6)
Jimmy Titus, 1B (9)
Nick Roy, OF (7)
People’s
Willy Yahn, SS (9)
Brendan Lynch, 3B (9)
Phillies
Trevor Moulton, P (6)
Aedin Wadja, 2B (7)
(Number of manager votes in parentheses)

Jets Soar, Earn 3rd Straight Pennant

Schult leads East Hartford Jets to third straight Twilight League playoff title
By Adam Betz, Journal Inquirer

MIDDLETOWN — Jim Schult is no stranger to success on the baseball diamond.

He had a standout career at Eastern Connecticut State University, including being named the 2011 National Collegiate Baseball Writers Association Division III National Player of the Year.

Since joining the East Hartford Jets of the Greater Hartford Twilight League in 2019 “after being on the couch for a few years,” that success has remained.

And it gained another example Tuesday.

Schult finished with two hits, two RBIs, a run scored, and was the winning pitcher as No. 2 East Hartford rallied to beat the third-seeded Vernon Orioles 5-4 to win their third straight GHTBL playoff championship at Palmer Field.

“It was hard to win the first one. It was really hard to repeat,” the 32-year-old Fishkill, New York native said. “We had a special group of guys that were able to battle through the adversity. … I’m not sure I have the best words to describe how I’m feeling right now, but it means a lot.”

Schult pitched 4 1/3 innings of relief. He allowed two runs on four hits, struck out seven, and walked one. At the plate, he was the only Jet with multiple hits.

Jim Schult, Pitcher/Outfielder, East Hartford Jets

“He leads us by example and he makes everyone around him better,” East Hartford player/manager Taylor Kosakowski said of Schult. “He’s the guy you want on the mound or at the plate in a big spot. He’s the guy you want to see up there.”

The Jets, who were co-regular season champions, finish 24-7. They lost their first game of the double-elimination tournament [to the Hartford Colts] before rattling off six straight wins, including a 5-1 win over the Orioles on Monday to force Tuesday’s winner-take-all game.

“It says a lot about who we are,” designated hitter Andy Pelc said. “I feel like that first game, even though it didn’t go our way, put a chip back on our shoulder. I think that’s the reason we’re here today.”

The Orioles were making their seventh straight championship game appearance Tuesday night. They finish 20-9.

“I’m really proud of how we played a much better game tonight,” manager Jack Ceppetelli said. “We swung the bats well against a couple of the premier pitchers in the league. We just ran into one bad inning.”

Jack Ceppetelli, Manager, Vernon Orioles

Vernon held a 2-0 lead and threatened to break the game open with the bases loaded and two down in the top of the third.

But Schult came in from right field and needed only one pitch to end the inning.

Manny Alejandro led off the bottom of the frame with a single, the first Jets’ baserunner.

East Hartford would load the bases, with the help of a two-out error, to set the stage for Schult. He sent the first pitch from starter Bill Riggieri to center for a two-run single to tie the game.

“I was just looking for a good pitch to hit,” Schult said. “I worked the count in my prior at-bat, so I got to see some pitches from him. It just so happened that I got a mistake with the first one.”

Janiel Ramirez drew a bases-loaded walk to break the tie and Pelc added a two-run single as East Hartford brought 10 batters to the plate in the inning to make it 5-2.

Janiel Ramirez, Outfielder, East Hartford Jets

The Orioles trimmed the deficit to one in the top of the sixth when Ian Halpin sent a two-run double to the right-field fence.

He finished with three hits Tuesday.

“That’s a huge hit to get us close in the sixth,” Ceppetelli said. “We just couldn’t quite get there.”

Schult regrouped and struck out the next batter looking to end the inning.

“I’ve got a whole bunch of guys in the dugout that are counting on me to get out of the inning,” Schult said. “We’re all hurting, we’re all tired at this point in the year. You just want to push through it. Like Bryan (Albee) threw 20-something innings for us during the playoffs, I wasn’t going to let him down. I wasn’t going to let anyone down. Just concentrating and finishing the job.”

Vernon jumped out to a 2-0 lead in the top of the first when Nick Roy scored on an error and Tyler Pogmore brought home Halpin with an RBI single.

Peter Kelley finished with two hits for Vernon. Riggieri took the loss. He allowed five unearned runs on five hits while striking out two and walking two over four innings.

East Hartford starter Albee, a member of Eastern’s National Championship team this year, allowed two runs — one of them earned — and struck out two in 2 2/3 innings.

2022 Playoff Championship winners, East Hartford Jets with Bill Holowaty, GHTBL President (right) and Andy Baylock, GHTBL Vice President (left).

Tuesday’s win was a bittersweet one for Kosakowski, who has managed the team since it re-formed in 2019 after folding a year prior. The Berlin native said he’s stepping down to devote more time to his family.

“Obviously, it’s very emotional,” he said. “Sixteen years playing in this league, it’s hard to come by a championship, let alone be a part of something this special. So, I hope I can continue to help out and contribute to the team as much as I can. I’m a school psychologist, and they always teach you to leave them better than you found them. For me, that’s what I’ve aimed to do with this team and I hope that I did that.”

Taylor Kosakowski, Player-manager, East Hartford Jets

2022 Playoff Championship on the Line

Will the East Hartford Jets earn a 3rd straight postseason title? That’s the question going into GHTBL’s 2022 Playoff Tournament.

The Jets have dominated as of late in close games and have blown out a few opponents as well. Yet, it was the Record-Journal Expos who also captured a share of the Regular Season Title. The other favorites remain the Vernon Orioles who finished third in the standings. M&T People’s and Rainbow Graphics hit their own hot streaks towards the end of the season and might have what it takes to win.

As the double-elimination tournament gets underway, here are some things to know:
– Stay tuned for rainout announcements and postponements.
– $10 admission for adults to the entire tournament.
– Free for kids 14 and under.
– Higher-seed teams are home team in the 1st Round.
– A coin flip determines home team for every round thereafter.

Expos & Jets, Regular Season Co-champions

Now that the 2022 Regular Season has come to a close, the Record-Journal Expos (18-6) and the East Hartford Jets (18-6) have agreed to split the Season Title. Both managers elected to share a co-championship this year. According to GHTBL By-laws this scenario takes place when two teams tie for first place in the standings:

VIII. Postseason Playoff 

C. In the result of a tie for Regular Season champion, a one game playoff will be scheduled to determine the champion. This game may be eliminated if both managers agree to a co-championship. If a co-Championship is elected, then seeding for the playoff will defer to:

  • 1) The Co-Champions head-to-head regular season record.
  • 2) If the head-to-head record also result in a tie seeding will then default to a coin flip conducted by the Executive Committee.

D. Season records determine the remaining seedings. If there is a tie for any seeding, regular season head-to-head record will prevail; if head-to-head record results in a tie a coin flip will then be implemented conducted by the Executive Committee. If there is more than two teams for any seeding position the process then be selected by lot. 

The Expos swept all three games from the Jets this summer, therefore Record-Journal will be the top seed in the upcoming Playoff Tournament. The playoff bracket is published on the homepage of www.GHTBL.org (scroll towards bottom).

As a recap of the Record-Journal Expos at M&T People’s game last night here’s an original article by Ron Buck, Special to the Record-Journal:

R-J Expos drop regular season finale, but still lay claim to Greater Hartford Twilight pennant.

HARTFORD — Even in defeat, the Record-Journal Expos won Thursday night.

Already secure in the knowledge they had wrapped up the No. 1 seed in next week’s Greater Hartford Twilight Baseball League playoffs, the Expos dropped their regular-season finale 1-0 to People’s Bank at Dunkin’ Donuts Park.

The loss prevented the Expos from winning the regular season outright and ended a six-game winning streak by the Meriden squad. The Expos finished the regular season 18-6.

People’s Bank, which scored the game’s only run in the bottom of the sixth inning, finished the season 14-9.

The Expos’ regular-season record is good enough to be, at the least, co-champions with the East Hartford Jets. The Jets (17-6) were on their way to tying the Expos for the regular-season title. At press time, they were leading the Hartford Colts 7-0 in the fourth inning of Thursday night’s nightcap of the Twilight Stadium Series 4 Sandy Hook Promise

The Expos, however, will earn the playoff’s top seed via a sweep of the Jets during the regular season. Looking to win Meriden’s first GHTBL tournament title since the Meriden Merchants went all the way in 2014, the Expos begin their quest Tuesday night at Palmer Field.

This is the second regular-season championship for player/manager Charlie Hesseltine, who saw his club win the 2019 pennant.

“The 1 seed was more important to us,” said Hesseltine. “I would have been nice to win. Justin (Marks) pitched great. Our bats were (just) hit and miss.” 

“But playing at Dunkin’ Donuts Park, everyone is trying to square one up and hit it a mile. It was a fun game,” added Hesseltine.

The Expos had one regular-season contest remaining — a game with People’s Bank on Tuesday at Ceppa Field was suspended by rain tied 2-2 in the top of the third — but they voted after Thursday’s game to forfeit the makeup. The decision was based on both teams’ desire to save their pitching for the playoffs.

“Our goal from the beginning of the year was to win the (postseason) championship,” said Hesseltine. “Regular-season standings never really matter because you have to beat everyone in the playoffs, but we played well all season.”

“We have four solid arms,” he added. “So as long as we hit, we have four pitchers for four games (in the playoffs).”

Marks, a tall lefty from Woodland High School, has shown why the Expos have the arms to win it all this season. He entered the game at Dunkin’ Donuts Park at a perfect 4-0 on the season with a 1.54 ERA, and he threw four more scoreless innings Thursday.

Marks hit the mid-to-high 80s in striking out seven.

“Our mindset is we got our loss out of the way (tonight) and we are ready for the playoffs” said Marks, who was making his seventh start of the season. “Tonight gives us confidence that we can beat anyone.”

Hesseltine picked up where Marks left off and struck out the side in the fifth inning.

People’s Bank scored, however, in the sixth after Hesseltine pitch brushed the jersey of Willy Yahm, who stole second and scored on a single by Brandon Lynch.

The Expos had their chances to score and, even in their final at-bat in the seventh, put a runner at second base with two outs via a ground-rule double by A.J. Hendrickson.

But Jason Sullivan struck out to end the game.

The Expos managed just four hits against four People’s Bank pitchers. And when they did come up with a few early hits, aggressiveness on the base paths were costly. A pair of Expos were thrown out at the plate in the third inning. 

Johnny Walter was out attempting to score from first base on Nhasean Murphy’s double into the left-field corner. Murphy was later called out at the plate on a close play trying to score after Sebby Grignano grounded out to shortstop.

The Expos also threatened in the second. Hendrickson singled sharply to left to start the inning. Sullivan then lined out to left field ahead of Shawn Remillard, who was thrown out at second trying to stretch a single into a double. 

Hendrickson moved to third base on Remillard’s ball into the right-center gap, but Will Kszywanos grounded out to third base to end the inning.

People’s Bank had its own struggles at the plate, managing just three hits off Marks and Hesseltine. The Expos’ hurlers allowed just two runners to reach second base before People’s broke through in the sixth inning.

This is the second regular-season title for the Expos in four years. The Expos, however, lost in the 2019 playoffs as the top seed. The Vernon Orioles won it all that year, while the Jets have won the past two championships.

“This year is a different group of guys,” said Kszywanos, who played for the 2019 Expos. “We are younger, more resilient and have a lot more chemistry.

“We have been together for so long, since Legion days,” added the first baseman. “And some of the younger guys are really stepping up at the plate. But pitching is going to win it, and Justin has been lights out. If we can string five or six hits together, we’ll be fine.”

The Jets and Vernon Orioles had been chasing the Expos all season. The O’s lost Wednesday night to the Wallingford Cardinals and finished 17-7. With a win later Thursday night, the Jets (17-6) were poised to earned the No. 2 seed.

Visit Record-Journal.com for more stories on the Expos from this season.

Stadium Series 4 Sandy Hook Promise

On Thursday, August 4, 2022, Greater Hartford Twilight Baseball League will fulfill its annual mission as a nonprofit organization. Players, coaches, families and fans are invited to the Twilight Stadium Series 4 Sandy Hook Promise – a doubleheader marking GHTBL’s sixth consecutive year of charity games at Dunkin’ Donuts Park. This special event is presented by Eversource Energy, which has supported the cause with a community grant and has been named GHTBL’s Presenting Sponsor.

Dunkin Donuts Park, Hartford, Connecticut

On the night of August 4, the Main Gate (near the Ticket Office) will be open at 5:30 PM to spectators. The first game will begin at 6:00 PM between the Meriden-based, Record-Journal Expos and the Wethersfield-based, M&T People’s franchise. At 8:00 PM the 2020 and 2021 Playoff Champions, East Hartford Jets will face the Hartford Colts.

  • Admission: $10 for adults. Free for kids 14 years old and under.
  • All proceeds: donated to Sandy Hook Promise.
  • Concessions: available on the first base side of the stadium, brought to you by facility hosts, the Hartford Yard Goats.
  • Buy tickets or donate online at www.givebutter.com/twi.
  • Parking: available in LAZ Parking lots for $5. (Public/metered parking within walking distance.)
  • Raffles: 50-50 Raffle hosted by GHTBL for $5.00 & Bat Raffle hosted by Probats (free with admission ticket)

More about Sandy Hook Promise (SHP), a charitable organization in Newtown, Connecticut:

Since the tragic events at Sandy Hook Elementary School nearly ten years ago, SHP has led a bipartisan movement to protect America’s children from gun violence. Most recently, the organization has engaged in educational workshops at schools across the United States. Over 23,000 “Know the Signs” programs have taught youth and adults how to prevent school violence. Students and educators learn how to identify at-risk behaviors and how to intervene to get help. According to SHP, “These early-prevention measures empower everyone to help keep schools and communities safe.”

Help us take action for the well-being of children and Sandy Hook Promise by attending the Twilight Stadium Series 4 Sandy Hook Promise. Or you can make a donation online:

  • DONATE or BUY TICKETS ONLINE in lieu of paying admission in person.
  • You will receive an email confirmation but there’s no need to print your tickets, as donors will be on a “Donor List” and admitted into the stadium at no additional charge.
  • ALL DONATIONS & TICKET PROCEEDS GO TO SANDY HOOK PROMISE.

*Both Greater Hartford Twilight Baseball League and Sandy Hook Promise are registered 501(c)(3) nonprofit organizations. W-9 forms are available at your request. Send any questions or correspondance to Contact@GHTBL.org.

Massicotte No-hits Cardinals

On Friday night, Jeff Massicotte steered the Record-Journal Expos to the franchise’s first no-hitter in nearly a decade. Massicotte’s gem came against the Wallingford Cardinals in an 8-0 victory. Massicotte is going to be a senior next year at St. Peter’s University where he plays Division-I ball. He’s from Meriden, Connecticut, and graduated from Maloney High School. He has been a part-time member of the Record-Journal Expos since 2016.

The last time a no-hitter was thrown by the Expos, it Kevin Jefferis in 2013, when the club was called the Connecticut Expos. Today, the team is currently a game back from the first place East Hartford Jets.

Cohen to Start Career at M&T Bank

In a bit of good news off the field, Andrew Cohen, pitcher for M&T People’s, has recently been hired by his team sponsor, M&T Bank. The career opportunity came about this past Spring and he will report to work in Wilmington, Delaware starting next week. Between then and now, Andrew has earned two wins and a save for Tom Abbruzzese’s “Bankers” franchise. Cohen graduated this past May from Bowdoin College. He grew up in Glastonbury and is a graduate of Loomis Chaffee. The GHTBL wishes Andrew all of the best in his professional pursuits!

The Twilight League would like to also express our gratitude to M&T Bank for sticking with the GHTBL as a team sponsor. The Buffalo, New York-based M&T Bank is currently acquiring the Bridgeport-based People’s United Bank in a high-profile merger. Here’s to a hundred years!

Rainbow Repels M&T People’s, 5-2

By Joshua Macala
raised || by || cassettes

On July 10, 2022, the M&T People’s at Rainbow Graphics game started at 5 PM. It ended around 6:30 PM. Both teams started this quick contest with the same record and were fighting for fourth place. While the Jets, Expos and Orioles hold the top three spots, this was a battle for the middle of the standings.

These are the next two best teams in the GHTBL in my opinion. Both teams can hit the ball and can categorized as be wildcard teams. You can’t always predict if the Graphics or People’s will win, but they usually grind out close games. This game was evenly matched too.

M&T People’s struck first. In the first inning, with two outs, Brendan Lynch would hit a home run out towards center field. People’s went up 1-0 early on but in the bottom of the second inning Bryan Rodriguez came home after an RBI single and then Austin Martin drove in another run with runners on second and third to give the Graphics a 2-1 lead. 

In the top of the fourth, the tying run scored for People’s when a bloop over second base. A number of Graphics players were caught watching it. Then the Graphics’ right fielder made a spectacular diving catch and it seemed to provide a boost of energy.

Graphics put up two more runs in the bottom of the fourth. After a HBP, a run was scored via a double and there was a bad throw to home. Had that throw been on target it might have very well gotten the runner and left the game tied. A sac fly by Austin Martin brought in the second run of the inning and the Graphics led comfortably, 4-2.  

I wasn’t the only one confused in the bottom of the fifth inning when Travis Salois singled in the fifth and final Graphics run of the game. People’s right fielder appeared to have caught the ball. There seemed to be some confusion by coaches and players alike, as it looked to have been caught. However the umpires said the ball was trapped, ruled the hit and the run scored. 

The good news coming out of this game was that the Graphics seem to have found another consistent starting pitcher in Ryan Skaff, who had a great game. The rarely seen bat of Travis Salois also proved to be effective and the offense shined when it needed to. Rainbow Graphics could be putting together a solid run towards the postseason and they might take some people by surprise.

Rainbow doesn’t play until Thursday when they go to Vernon. If the Graphics manage to get a win against the Orioles, it could push into third place. The Graphics will also meet the Colts on Friday at Northwest Park at 7 PM.

For People’s, Brendan Lynch has been a consistent bat but their club has had their ups and downs offensively. People’s has days when they can’t be stopped but on other days, they might fail to produce at the plate. Their pitching staff can also be spotty at times but they have pulled together some good performances lately.

M&T People’s are going to Ceppa Field in Meriden on Tuesday, where they last defeated the Record-Journal Expos. People’s then also returns home on Thursday night to welcome the Phillies, who have had a rough but resilient season.

With so much happening this week in the GHTBL, the standings could see some major changes by the end of it. The Expos could move into first, the Orioles could move down to fourth and the Colts could climb up as People’s sink down. Many factors make this week a big one for the league and it’s one week closer to the Playoff Tournament in early August.

Orioles, Jets & Expos Feud for 1st Place

Greater Hartford Twilight Baseball League is nearly halfway through the 2022 Regular Season and once again, the Vernon Orioles are up to their usual habits; winning ball games. Yet the two-time reigning Playoff Champions, the East Hartford Jets, are currently tied with the Orioles for first place. The Jets also have the upperhand in terms of runs scored and runs allowed.

Then there’s the Record-Journal Expos, who are only a game behind from a three-way tie atop the standings. They have two wins on the year against the Jets in games decided by one-run margins. Expos also have a slightly easier schedule in the second half of the 2022 season.

Here are the remaining games between these three clubs:

See the full schedule at www.GHTBL.org/Schedule.

Orioles Outdueled 6-2 by Hesseltine

By Joshua Macala
raised || by || cassettes

After meeting each other this past Sunday in Vernon, the Record-Journal Expos and Vernon Orioles were ready to do battle once again. Only this time on the Expos’ home turf. The Orioles won the game on Sunday but the Expos were coming off of a win over Rainbow Graphics, who are having a good season start. The Expos went into this game with a 4-2 record while the O’s were 6-1.  

This game had a lot of implications, such as if the Orioles lost they would have two losses – same as the Expos – and the Jets would become the only team with only one loss. As the O’s did lose, this put them at 6-2 and the Expos at 5-2 which seems to put them closer together in the rankings. Had this game gone differently the Expos would’ve seemed to dropped down.

This game started off with both teams getting runners on in scoring position but nothing coming of it. The first two innings saw nothing happen on offense and only behind the pitching of Charlie Hesseltine did the Orioles seem to not be able to even get a hit off. The first two innings alone saw four strikeouts for Hesseltine who was on his game in the best possible way this evening.  

In the bottom of the third the Expos got the bases loaded and then on a wild pitch a run would score- the first run of the game. It would take all the way until the top of the fifth inning for a single to score a run for the O’s and it was all tied at 1-1. This would not last very long as the Expos needed some insurance runs going into the last two innings for the Orioles and they were going to get them in grand fashion.

AJ Hendrickson brought in the go ahead run in the bottom of the fifth inning. This would keep the bases loaded and another run would walk in. Jonathan Walter would hit a huge single to drive in a runs. Justin Marks would also RBI in another run, the fifth and final run of the inning. This would put the Expos up 6-1, and it appeared the O’s were all but through. The burst of offense really broke the game wide open and it was so great to see.

With this win, the Expos continue their battle for second place as they face the first place East Hartford Jets on Monday in East Hartford. The Orioles are off to face the Bristol Greeners in a doubleheader on Tuesday and even though the odds seem to be in favor of the O’s, with doubleheaders you never know who might prevail. Next week seems like it could reshape the standings depending upon who wins and who loses. 

Eastern’s World Series Winners

Recently, five GHTBL alumni were victorious on the national stage for Eastern Connecticut State University. Bryan Albee, Jack Rich, Zach Donahue, Aidan Dunn and Andres Jose earned a D-III College World Series Championship ring over LaGrange University in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. Congratulations to Head Coach Brian Hamm, who has captured Eastern’s fifth national title. Guided by Hamm, Albee, Rich, Donahue, Jose and Dunn have become proven winners, on and off the field. GHTBL is grateful to have these men as representatives of our league.

Graduating senior Bryan Albee plans to pitch for the East Hartford Jets, who are currently in first place in the GHTBL standings. Albee nabbed the Mike Abbruzzese Award for Outstanding Playoff Pitcher last season with the Jets. Jack Rich is also aboard the Record-Journal Expos as their perennial all-star outfielder. Last year, Jack was the Frank McCoy Award winner for Most Valuable Player in the league.

Want to rewatch the clinching World Series game? CLICK HERE

Cardinals Fly by People’s, 11-6

By Joshua Macala
raised || by || cassettes

One of the things I knew going into this game was that both teams were winless on the year up to this point. Wallingford Cardinals and M&T People’s are off to rough starts. What I hadn’t considered going into this game was that this would be my third time seeing the Wallingford Cardinals play and that’s as many times as I’ve seen the Record-Journal Expos play. Perhaps this season will brew a rivalry between cross town teams, as Ceppa Field and Pat Wall Field aren’t too far apart.

The Cardinals came out hot and started this game like they were going to make a statement about it. There have been certain last place teams in the league over the years who ended up disbanding like Malloves Jewelers – so in many ways it felt like the Cardinals wanted to get on a winning track. A double and two singles put together two runs for the Cardinals in the first inning. Then a walk and another double brought home two more runs after yet another double and a run scored to give the Cardinals a 5-0 lead right away. This would be the theme of the game, though it would only happen over two innings when the Cardinals offense exploded. 

People’s pushed a run across in the bottom of the third, making it a 5-1 game. They found life in their offense with a single and a stolen base, but they couldn’t figure out the pitching of Wallingford’s Alex Koletar. Meanwhile, People’s had some pitching problems. The staff would give up a hit, walk someone, then a passed ball would move the runners over, then another walk or single and ultimately the runs would home. It was small ball in that way – advancing the runners – but the pitching helped Wallingford by missing the mark. People’s changed their pitcher and would go on a good defensive stretch. They kept the Cardinals from scoring up until the fifth inning.  

The top of the fifth started with a home run deep to left field by Evan Wilkinson. That started a big inning for the Cardinals. A walk and a single brought about another pitching change, but then a walk loaded the bases. A strikeout got the first out of the inning but then a run scored on a wild pitch. Another walk loaded up the bases and a single scored two runs as People’s catcher went down looking hurt. A quick strikeout for two outs in the inning but then a run scored on a wild pitch. And after that, a run scored on another wild pitch. 

A final pitching change led to back-to-back walks but a third strikeout finally ended the fifth inning. People’s got out of it with the Cardinals putting up six runs. It was now 11-1 and People’s would have a long path to stage a comeback. People’s had a runner on second base in the bottom of the fifth but a strikeout and double play put that inning to an end. They would keep the Cardinals from scoring for the rest of the game but they weren’t done on offense yet. People’s had some catching up to do and they almost did it.

In the bottom of the sixth inning a double brought in a run and then a three run homer by Isaiah Rivera gave People’s some hope, as they were now down 11-5. Just like that, things can change and even when you’re up five runs or even ten runs you never quite know what will happen. People’s had that chance to walk it off. In the bottom of the seventh a run scored for People’s on a wild pitch with two outs but then a strikeout ended the game at 11-6.

This game took M&T People’s to 0-3 as they struggle to find a win this season. But it took the Cardinals to 1-4, which might not seem great but it’s a win that could push them to keep winning. Though they started their season 0-4, the Cardinals also took those losses to the Expos, Orioles, Colts and Graphics. While the Cardinals are meeting the Expos again on Wednesday night at Pat Wall Field, perhaps a true test for the Cardinals will come next Tuesday when they meet the Phillies.

Expos Clip Jets, 4-3

By Joshua Macala
raised || by || cassettes

Baseball is such a wild game. After watching a GHTBL game on Wednesday in the rain, then being rained out on Thursdaynwith the sun shining, I thought for sure this would be the game without rain. A big, dark cloud came over Ceppa Field but it didn’t threaten any rain at first. Part way through the game, that same cloud opened up and the rain went from a drizzle to near downpour. Yes, for the second time in week I was caught in the rain watching a baseball game.

The Record-Journal Expos and East Hartford Jets both came into this game undefeated. The Jets had played one more game than the Expos, so the Jets were 3-0 while the Expos were 2-0. What’s notable about their records? Well, had the game not been postponed due to weather the night before, the Expos may have beaten the Bristol Greeners, so both teams could have gone into this game at 3-0. But this rain really has been something else this week and it amazes me that the baseball continues during the deluge.

In the top of the first inning, Jets shortstop Jeff Criscuolo made it to third base but after two strikeouts from Expos ace pitcher Justin Marks the inning would come to an end without any runs. The bottom of the first inning was a different story entirely for the Expos. Kyle Hartenstein was walked onto first base. Jason Sullivan hit a huge double to put the runners onto second and third. And then AJ Hendrickson came up to the plate and smashed a three run homerun.

Knowing where that ball went over the fence near left field, I was looking for it near the road but couldn’t find it. Someone was sitting on the road in their car and there was another random person just walking by. I assumed at that point perhaps someone had just been like “Oh! A baseball!” and picked it up. But I followed what I felt like was the flight path and sure enough I found the home run ball that Hendrickson smashed. It was across the street and in the yard of the house there.

The rest of this game was a stalemate. Jets pitcher Cole Lalli seemed to have two modes: either throwing all strikes and thus a strikeout occurred or throwing all balls and thus, a walk. It was either hard down the middle or it was bouncing in front of the plate. Both teams played a tight defense leading up until the final portion of the game. The top of the third saw two great catches by Will Kszywanos and Justin Marks, while runners got on base for both teams but were unable to score. Marks stuck out the side in the fourth inning – and into the fifth, two more strikeouts probably made him the player of this game.

The Expos scored another run in the bottom of the fifth making it 4-0 (they ended up needing that insurance run). The Jets then plated a runner in the top of the sixth as Charlie Hesseltine would come in to pitch. As the game headed into the bottom of the sixth, the rain picked up. The rain started off where you just felt some droplets and it wasn’t too big of a deal, but it quickly grew consistent. If you were in it for a minute or so you’d be soaked. Nearly everyone in the stands took cover where they could and somehow the game persisted. I’m always worried about the ball being able to be gripped in the rain, but the Expos and Jets played on.

At one point, one of the Jets lost control and their bat went flying because it was wet. This felt like one of those signs that playing in the rain was a tad dangerous but no one was stopping the game. The umpires were getting as soaked as the players! In the bottom of the sixth it felt as if the inning was cut short and I felt like the game was either going into a rain delay or being called early but apparently there were three outs. The Jets put up a run in the top of the sixth and had the momentum they to have a chance at winning.

In the last inning, with the score at 4-1 in favor of the Expos, Charlie Hesseltine had a hard time controlling his fastball. At one point, the ball even got away from catcher AJ Hendrickson. It was a bit of a mess and back-to-back doubles scored two more runs, putting the game at 4-3 and the Expos still leading. The last out came as a strikeout and it sealed the fate for the Jets, who were quite amused in the dugout with the way this game was going. While the rain was also making it darker and hard to see, it was making it just so difficult to control the ball and I think that was really the story of the end of the game here.

Now let’s be realistic. The Expos were at home. If the Jets managed to either tie this game or go ahead, then the Expos would still have their final at bats and the Jets would have been the one’s pitching in the rain. It seemed like it was a lot easier to hit the ball while the rain was coming down than it was to control a fastball. The rain actually started to let up a little bit before the game ended, but it certainly did feel like a factor in the end of this game. A 3-0 game turned into a 4-3 final after the rain and it made for an exciting ending.

With the Orioles taking a 1-0 loss to the Jets, this game was actually a battle between the last two undefeated teams in the GHTBL. By winning this game, the Expos now are solely in first place and the only team yet to face defeat. 

In the week ahead they’re looking at two opponents they’ve already beaten, the Wallingford Cardinals, in Wallingford on Wednesday night and the South Windsor Phillies will come back to Ceppa Field on Friday, June 10th. However, before all of that the Rainbow Graphics come to Ceppa Field for the next Expos game on June 7th, which could be interesting because the Graphics have a history of being a tough opponent for the Expos. Rainbow Graphics are also 3-1 on the year so it should be a good game to watch.

Colts Shuffle Cards, 7-3

By Joshua Macala
raised || by || cassettes

What makes the Hartford Colts vs. Wallingford Cardinals such an intriguing matchup is that both of these teams are fairly new to the league and both feature former Ulbrich Steel players. The Wallingford Cardinals (brand new for this season) went into this game 0-2 with losses to the Expos on their Opening Day and then the Orioles after that in the Cardinals’ home opener. The Expos and Orioles are generally considered to be amongst the top teams though, so having those losses isn’t really a cause for alarm.

The Hartford Colts are a somewhat new team, and they went into this game 1-1, with a huge victory over the Greeners and a loss to the Champion Jets.  While the Cardinals, led by Manager Jeff DeMaio, were looking for that first win, the Colts were looking to stay above .500. And rightfully so, both teams toughed it out, neither wanting to be the losing side. Sometimes you go into a game where one team is favored over another, but this felt like a game either team could win, and it stayed that way until the last inning.

Both the top and bottom half of the first inning went 1-2-3. The second inning came and the Colts got on top. And it would stay that way. A series of singles drove in two runs, the second run not even being contested at the plate when there was a chance that the Cardinals could’ve had a play. That very well might have been the key moment of the game, where the Colts went up 2-0 and stayed ahead of the Cardinals until the very end. The Cardinals scored a run of their own to answer back in the bottom of the second and make it 2-1, but then a runner was caught stealing with only one out, which makes you wonder why they’re taking such chances in a close game.  

In the top of the third inning with runners on first and third, a run scored for the Colts on a balk. A gapped double in the bottom of the third scored another run for the Cardinals, keeping the game close at 3-2. By the third inning, the rain had come in. It started off just a little bit where I could see some droplets, but eventually, it opened up for an inning or two where it was coming down steadily. It wasn’t that heavy, as other fans went under umbrellas or took cover somewhere, but I stayed in it, and so did the players and umpires. It’s not quite warm enough yet into summer where the rain felt refreshing, but it also isn’t cold enough to where I had to hide from it. I was most concerned about the handling of the ball.

The fourth inning went by without any runs scored but then in the top of the 5th the Colts went up 4-2 as a runner was able to score on a wild pitch. This game was a lot about putting the ball into play, getting those hits and moving the runners to score.  A few errors also helped, but this game remained close throughout, and up until the end, it was either team’s game to win. In the bottom of the fifth, the Colts escaped trouble with a double play followed by a pop-up to first. In the bottom of the sixth, the Cards would double then a single would bring in a run, leaving it 4-3 with one inning left to play. There was a solid chance here that if the Colts didn’t add some insurance runs the Cardinals could be motivated to walk it off.  

This game started in somewhat overcast weather and even though it rained a bit and then the rain stopped, this was one of those games where you had to watch until the end to see who won. In the top of the seventh inning, the Colts got runners on first and second, but they eventually did a double steal to advance. This wouldn’t really matter as the Cardinals changed pitchers and then a hit-by-pitch loaded the bases. 

A huge single past first base scored two runs for the Colts. It was what they needed to win this game. A pitch got by Cardinals’ catcher Adam Leone for a third and final run to score, making this game 7-3. The fact that the Cardinals put up three runs all game seemed to infer that they wouldn’t be able to put up three or more in one inning and that was all they had left. A huge double play and then a slow-rolling groundout to first ended the game and secured the Colts’ win.

There are several factors to consider why this game went the way that it did. First off, if the Colts did not put up those three runs in the top of the seventh and this was a different team, the Cardinals could have easily tied it or even walked it off and got the win. It really felt like the pitching by Alex Koletar for the Cardinals kept this game within reach for them the entire time. And yet the complete game pitched by Matt Goldman was what also helped the Colts get the win here. A pitching effor like that is often needed to win games. Both teams had it going on this night, but the Colts took advantage of more breaks. Perhaps if Goldman wasn’t pitching, the Cardinals would’ve had a win, but that’s hypothetical

Coming out of this game, the Hartford Colts improve to 2-1 and have People’s and the Orioles on deck to face. This will be an interesting next few games for the Colts because if they can defeat the Orioles and hand them their first loss, they’ll be right up there in the top of the league. At the same time, the Cardinals are up against People’s, the Graphics and the Expos again. It might be a tough week coming for them, as they have their work cut out for them, but one of these games might be their chance to get their first win. People’s are the interesting team coming out of this game because thus far they have only played once and it was a loss so what fate awaits them against both Colts and Cardinals will be fun to see.  

Expos Expose Phillies, 7-0

By Joshua Macala
raised || by || cassettes

Exactly one week after their season opener, the Record-Journal Expos returned to Ceppa Field to take on the South Windsor Phillies and scored 7 runs once again. The Phillies and Expos have quite the rivalry going, and so this was promising to be a stellar matchup. Both teams have, in recent seasons, finished in first place even though the then champions would go on to become either the Orioles or Jets. Some teams are at the top of the league, the middle of the league and the bottom of the league. The Expos and Phillies are both top-of-the-league teams, so playing each other should be exciting baseball.

The Expos scored five runs during the bottom of the second inning. It was a deficit from which the Phillies were unable to overcome. A hit-by-pitch, two walks and then a run was walked in as well before AJ Hendrickson hit a deep shot to center field to clear the bases. That double drove in three runs. It would’ve been a grand slam if it went over the fence (I thought it did at first). In the bottom of the sixth inning, Hendrickson would do the same as he hit a long shot out to left field to score two more runs. Five of the seven runs in the game would be AJ Hendrickson’s runs batted in.

While this might not seem like a big deal because players can have big offensive nights, the fact is that AJ Hendrickson was also pitching the entire game and he managed to shut out the Phillies, barely giving up any hits. There were only one or two occasions where it really felt like the Phillies might have a chance to score and then those opportunities quickly got shut down. In many ways, it felt like Hendrickson was doing everything in this game and that just feels even more surreal considering how he played last game, but this was definitely a team effort when you don’t just consider the statistics of it all.

For one thing, the Expos have a new player in Javon Malone and he not only drove in a run but also had a few well-made defensive plays. Everyone seemed to step up offensively for Record-Journal; taking the walk when they needed to, and going that extra mile defensively to make it so that the Phillies couldn’t score. To start off this season with these first few games, everything is clicking for the Expos and their offense and defense are both delivering the way they should.

But with this game it should also be noted that the Phillies played well. The second inning was their biggest downfall and aside from that the combined pitching efforts of Noah Shaw and Connor Egan left the Expos scoreless for five innings. Offensively, the Phillies were missing Brody Labbe and Mike Lisinicchia, as well as Trevor Moulton as a pitcher, but these are just things which happen at the beginning of the season. Jack Rich has yet to play for the Expos as he is off doing great things with the ECSU Baseball team.  

With only two games into the season for the Expos (and the most games being played is three) it might be a bit early to see this as being a runaway season for the Expos. What the standings look like now- with the Expos, Jets and Orioles on top. But it is interesting to see that the new team of the Cardinals is 0-2 while the somewhat new team of the Greeners is 0-3. Whether they can turn their seasons around or not remains to be seen but there is a lot of baseball to be played still so it’s anybody’s game.

While the Expos only had one game last week, they play three this week. They go to Muzzy Field on Thursday night to take on the Greeners, who will be looking for their first win. Then on Friday night they welcome the Jets to Ceppa Field – a matchup to anticipate because the Jets are the reigning and defending Twi Champions. Baseball is one of those unpredictable sports though where it seems like the Greeners should be an easy win but they might not be. I’ve seen it before where first place teams fall to last place teams (mostly the Mets in previous years) and it doesn’t make sense but it happens.  

So even though it feels like Thursday should be an easy win and Friday will be more of a competitive game, anything can happen and you never really know until that game happens. The historic Muzzy Field is a great place to watch baseball and these two games just feel like they’re going to set an important tone for the rest of the season. Either way, win or lose, it’s a nice time of year to be outside watching baseball again. 

Honoring Fallen Soldiers on Memorial Day

On this Memorial Day the Greater Hartford Twilight Baseball League honors the legacy of every United States military service member who made the ultimate sacrifice. Since the forming of our nation, soldiers have fought for freedom and justice. This most somber of national holidays is a reminder to be grateful for those who defended America.

After all, our way of life hinges on the valorous acts of military servicemen and women. Because of their unwavering commitment to duty, millions of Americans prosper today. Due to the significance of our fallen heroes, communities like Greater Hartford can have trivial things like amateur baseball. GHTBL players, coaches and league officials express our sincere gratitude this Memorial Day.

St. Cyril’s Baseball Club, The Semi-Pro Polish-Americans From Hartford

During the “Roaring Twenties” immigrant communities often integrated themselves into American culture by forming baseball clubs. Members of Hartford’s Polish-American community organized St. Cyril’s Baseball Club in 1925 on behalf of Saints Cyril and Methodius Parish, a Catholic church established in Hartford in 1902. The original nine was managed by Jack J. Zekas and assisted by Stanley “Spike” Spodobalski. Catcher Francis “Frankie” Kapinos captained the team from behind the plate.

St. Cyril’s organizes first baseball club, 1925.

St. Cyril’s joined its first amateur league in 1926, the Hartford Amateur Baseball League. It was a precursor to the Hartford Twilight League and sponsored by the Hartford Courant. St. Cyril’s vied for the “Courant Cup” but landed fourth in the standings. Player-manager John Strycharz steered the team which included Bob Young, a pitcher from University of Wisconsin and Ray Swartz of Notre Dame University. The following year, St. Cyril’s scheduled matchups with “fast semi-pro teams”¹ throughout Connecticut.

1926 St. Cyril’s Baseball Club
Hartford Courant excerpt, June 7, 1927.

After a five year hiatus caused by the Great Depression, St. Cyril’s returned to the field in 1933. Nicknamed the Saints, they earned a reputation as Hartford’s best Catholic club. Nearly every player was of Polish descent. Edward Kostek served as the team’s new manager. Jack Repass, an infielder, cut his teeth with St. Cyril’s in 1938, before becoming Secretary of the Twilight League and Founder of the Greater Hartford Twilight Baseball Hall of Fame.

1938 St. Cyril’s Baseball Club

St. Cyril’s won its first championship in 1939 as part of the Central Connecticut League. Then they secured the Connecticut District Semi-Pro Title of 1940. Pitching aces, Casimir “Cos” Wilkos and Yosh Kinel headlined the roster. Also on staff was Walter “Monk” Dubiel, a 22 year old rookie who later became one of Hartford’s all-time hurlers following a career with the Yankees and Cubs. After their days with St. Cyril’s, all three pitchers (Wilkos, Kinel, and Dubiel) were inducted into the GHTBL Hall of Fame.

Casimir “Cos” Wilkos, St. Cyril’s, 1939.
Walter “Monk” Dubiel, 1940.

In the wake of World War II, St. Cyril’s rejoined the Greater Hartford Twilight Baseball League. Nearly every Twi-loop game was held at Municipal Stadium or on one of a dozen skin diamonds at Colt Park. Standout players for manager Kostek during the 1940’s were Pete Sevetz and Charlie Puziak. Some of the men played ball to forget the horrors they saw while at war. Others played for the love of the game and in between work hours life, not unlike amatuer players of today.

1947 St. Cyril’s Baseball Club
L to R: Twilight Leaguers, Tom Deneen of St. Cyril’s, Dick Foley of Pratt Whitney Aircraft and Bill George of Yellow Cab at Colt Park, Hartford, 1947.

Manager Kostek led St. Cyril’s on a winning crusade during the 1950’s. Many professional players suited up for the run, such as Charlie Wrinn, Don Deveau and Ed Samolyk. They conquered multiple titles starting with a sweep of the 1951 Hartford Twilight League Season Title and Playoff Championship. Five years later, the club nabbed the 1956 Season Title and Playoff Championship. In 1957, they captured the State Semi-Pro Title and the Eastern Regional Semi-Pro Title.

1951 St. Cyril’s Baseball Club
Charlie Wrinn, Pitcher, St. Cyril’s, 1951.
Hartford Courant excerpt, September 8, 1951.
1953 St. Cyril’s Baseball Club

In 1958, the Polish National Home hosted a testimonial dinner in honor of Ed Kostek and his St. Cyril’s Baseball Club. Former Business Manager of the Hartford Chiefs, Charles Blossfield gave remarks commending Kostek for his coaching achievements. Also in attendance were Brooklyn Dodgers scout John “Whitney” Piurek of West Haven and Kostek’s former player and longtime friend, Monk Dubiel.

L to R: Whitey Piurek, Ed Kostek and Monk Dubiel at the Polish National Home, Hartford, 1958.
1959 St. Cyril’s Baseball Club

St. Cyril’s last pennant-winning season came in 1960. The club finished in first in the Greater Hartford Twilight Baseball League with a 17-4 win-loss record. Outfielder and GHTBL Hall of Famer, Robert Neubauer was the team’s star player (Neubauer later became a celebrated coach at Sheehan High School in Wallingford, CT). St. Cyril’s, finally played its final season in 1962 and the Catholic baseball dynasty was finally retired after 35 years of play.

St. Cyril’s Manager, Ed Kostek (middle) accepts Hartford Twilight Season Title trophy from Lou Morotto and Jim Nesta, 1960.
Valco Machine beats St. Cyril’s in Playoff Championship 1960.

Sources

  1. Hartford Courant database on Newspapers.com
  2. 1929 to 1979 GHTBL 50th Anniversary Program

2022 Regular Season Preview

Greater Hartford Twilight Baseball League returns for the 93rd year!

This summer, GHTBL will utilize some of Connecticut’s top ballparks, including Muzzy Field, Palmer Field, Trinity College and Dunkin’ Donuts Park. Players from as far as Boston, Massachusetts, to Stamford, Connecticut, will compete in the league. A 24-game Regular Season will open at 3 PM, Sunday, May 22, 2022. The Rainbow Graphics are to host Jack Ceppetelli’s Vernon Orioles at Mount Nebo Park in Manchester, CT.

Ceppetelli has managed the Orioles since 2001. Before then Jack was a pitcher with the O’s for two decades. Kevin Powell, another Oriole of the 1980’s, will serve his second year as bench coach. Powell recently retired from Travelers Insurance after a 38 year career. Mainstay Orioles like the Trubia brothers and the Halpin brothers are expected back for another season. Former minor leaguer Jimmy Titus has also declared for Vernon.

Vernon Orioles, 2021.

Rainbow Graphics has their own share of experience. Along with player-manager Tyler Repoli, fixtures like Evan Chamberlain, Travis Salois and Eric Anderson will suit up for the Graphics. Other than the season opener, Rainbow home games will be hosted at Northwest Park in Manchester. Many thanks to Fred Kask and the Rainbow Graphics team for sponsoring GHTBL’s longest-running franchise.

Meanwhile, Manager Taylor Kosakowski and the East Hartford Jets are seeking a three-peat. Another Playoff Championship run will require solid performances from Kosakowski’s fleet of everyday position players. They include Jeff Criscuolo, Jim Schult, Nate Viera and Corey Plasky, who’ve been consistent on both sides of the ball for East Hartford. Bryan Albee of Eastern Connecticut State University is also expected to return to the mound.

Nearby in South Windsor, the Phillies and Manager Ron Pizzanello are preparing for the summer. The Phillies also have a solid core of players who have been with South Windsor since 2018. They are Brody Labbe, Pat McMahon, Aedin Wadja and Jake Petrozza. A few additions to the team are Wendell Anderson, the 2002 GHTBL MVP and AJ Pietrafesa of Massachusetts Maritime Academy.

As for Tom Abbruzzese’s Wethersfield-based franchise, the team has been renamed M&T People’s (formerly People’s United Bank). First-year players will include Jordan Valentino of Saint Joseph’s College of Maine, Nick Tuozzola, a graduate of SUNY Purchase and at least four players from Elms College. The most veteran players on People’s are Brendan Lynch and Eric Malinowski.

Eric Malinowski, People’s, 2019.

Recently, President Holowaty has welcomed Ryan Ruggiero as the newest member of the Executive Committee. Ryan joins the league as the official Statistician. He’ll also assist with operations for the Hartford Colts franchise. The Colts expect to field many players currently in college including Kyle Darby of Westfield State University, Kiernan Caffrey of American International College, Sean Jefferson of Albertus Magnus College and AJ Desarro of New England College.

The most newcomers of 2022 will likely appear for the Wallingford Cardinals, who have become sponsors in place of Ulbrich Steel. General Manager Chris Bishop and Manager Jeff DeMaio will welcome numerous collegiate players like Evan Wilkinson of Post University and Zach Pincince of University of New Haven. Returners such as Sam DeMaio, Alex Koletar and Brendan O’Connell will continue to be key contributors for Wallingford.

The league’s westernmost franchise, the Bristol Greeners, will play eight games at Muzzy Field this year. Trevor Mays takes the reins as a first-time player-manager. Greeners catcher, AJ Lorenzetti, will look to repeat his 2021 All-Star performance.

Muzzy Field, Bristol, Connecticut.

Last but not least, the Record-Journal Expos will be directed by player-manager, Charlie Hesseltine, who’s been a part of the twi-loop since 2005. Other veteran players like AJ Hendrickson, Jonathan Walter and Sebby Grignano will perform under the lights at Ceppa Field. Current college athletes for the Meriden-based franchise are Jason Sullivan of Albertus Magnus, Carson Coon of Manhattan College and Kameron Hartenstein of SUNY Cortland.

On August 4, 2022, the league will hold our 6th annual charity series at Dunkin’ Donuts Park. Hosted by the Hartford Yard Goats, the GHTBL will fundraise for a charitable cause by selling $10 tickets at the Main Gate. Tickets are valid for both games of the doubleheader at 6 PM and 8 PM. Concessions will be open. More details to come!

The 2022 Playoff Tournament will follow a few days after the Regular Season. Our double-elimination championship will transpire at Palmer Field in Middletown and at McKenna Field in East Hartford. Five appearances are required to qualify a player for the postseason.

Note to new players seeking a team in the GHTBL: Fill out a Player Application. Amateurs with collegiate-caliber abilities are most likely to be contacted by GHTBL managers who immediately receive these applications.

Nick Hock Hired to Minor League Post

Recently, Hartford Colts ace, Nick Hock accepted a job with the Baltimore Orioles organization. This spring Hock will ship out to Salisbury, Maryland, to work for the Delmarva Shorebirds of the Single-A Carolina League. He’ll be a member of the Player Development Department serving as an assistant to the coaching staff. Hock also expects to throw batting practice and simulated games. Shorebird home games are played at Arthur W. Perdue Stadium.

Hailing from Wethersfield, Connecticut, Hock has played twilight ball for the last five years. He’s thrown 252.2 innings, tallying 215 strikeouts, 9 complete games and 3 shutouts. Hock was named a GHTBL All-Star three times and won the Mike Liappes Award for Most Valuable Pitcher in 2020. Please join us in congratulating Nick Hock on his next baseball chapter!

Opening Day: May 22

Coming soon to a ballpark near you, the GHTBL will begin its 93rd year of play. This season’s Opening Day will be held at Mount Nebo Park in Manchester, Connecticut, at 5 PM, Sunday, May 22, 2022. Manager Jack Ceppetelli and the Vernon Orioles will face Manager Tyler Repoli and the Rainbow Graphics. Last season, these teams split their head-to-head matchup with one win each.

This season, the GHTBL will go back to its traditional format. Each franchise will play three games against every other franchise. The 24-game schedule will be the most Regular Season games planned by the league since 2019. Things are finally back to normal for the time being.

However, since there are 9 clubs competing this year, the GHTBL Playoff Tournament will include a “play-in” game of the 8th and 9th place finishers. An 8-team double-elimination tournament will follow the “play-in” game.

As for the players; 225+ athletes are expected to suit up this summer. Plenty of returners and newcomers will fill a variety of roles throughout the league. From everyday position players, to relief pitchers and part-timers, local amateurs will travel from as far as Groton, Connecticut, and Longmeadow, Massachusetts, to contend for a championship.

A vast majority of GHTBL players are also current or former college players. A handful are ex-professionals. A few are high school prospects. They join the twi-loop for various reasons: to develop into a better player, for the love of the game, camaraderie with teammates. Whatever the reason, the GHTBL is grateful to remain one of most talent laden summer leagues in Connecticut.

GHTBL provides a pure, throwback style of the game while representing a highly competitive class of baseball. Wood bats and MLB Rules are enforced in a 7-inning format. To learn more about playing in the GHTBL, go to www.GHTBL.org/join.

Twilight League Seeks More Collegiate Players

As the NCAA season gets underway, the Greater Hartford Twilight Baseball League wishes every college ballplayer all of the best this Spring. Special shoutouts go to those players who have recently honed their skills in the GHTBL. From Jack Rich and Brian Albee at Eastern Connecticut State University to Josh Pabilonia and Julian Gonzalez at Western Connecticut State University, players from the Twi-loop are expected to make their mark on the NCAA*.

There are roughly 34,500 college baseball players who compete each year in the United States. Student-athletes commit to their sweat, tears and sometimes blood to university programs. GHTBL is proud of our many college players who manage to juggle school, baseball, career and family life. Living up to these tall tasks is never easy.

However, nothing worth doing is ever easy. GHTBL Managers are seeking new recruits who have the work ethic, character and experience to compete at the college level. Our franchises have one goal: to improve baseball players on and off the field. We welcome current, future or former college athletes to fill out a Player Application found here: www.GHTBL.org/Join.

*GHTBL abides by strict amateur rules. No gifts, favors or money are dealt to players. These are violations of our By-laws found here: www.GHTBL.org/by-laws.

We’ll see you this summer and in the meantime…swing away!



CT Patch Features Schweighoffer, Former GHTBL Star

Meet a Local Ex-Pro Ballplayer: Mike Schweighoffer, Farmington

By Tim Jensen, Patch Staff

FARMINGTON, CT — If Mike Schweighoffer was playing baseball today, no scout would even give him a look. The way the game has changed, no one would be interested in a pitcher who throws 83 MPH sinker balls, who never tossed a varsity inning until his senior year of high school, who attended a Division III college in Connecticut best known for its outstanding academic standards.

Fortunately for Schweighoffer, times were different in the early 1980s. Not only did a scout sign him to a professional contract, he spent four solid seasons in the Los Angeles Dodgers organization before embarking on an even more successful career, which continues today, as a banking executive.

Mike Schweighoffer, 2021

Now 59, Schweighoffer grew up in Hartford’s South End, and moved to Wethersfield just in time to start high school. He played football and baseball at now-defunct South Catholic High School, but even he never harbored dreams of someday becoming a professional athlete.

“I was a very late bloomer for my position,” he said in an exclusive interview with Patch. “I was an All-State shortstop, but had no expectations of playing pro ball.”

He chose to stay near home and attend Trinity College, where he majored in economics. He also went out for the baseball team, and made the squad as a pitcher. In his freshman campaign, “I was just a thrower,” but Schweighoffer learned the finer points about pitching from Bill Severni, who had played at Amherst College and overseas.

“Bill taught me more about pitching than any coach I ever had,” he said. “He taught me about mechanics, thinking about pitching and setting up hitters.”

As a junior with the Bantams, Schweighoffer played third base on days when he wasn’t pitching, and Trinity won the ECAC New England Regional championship. He also kept active during the summer by pitching for the Newington Capitols of the Greater Hartford Twilight League.

“By my senior year, my arm was hurting a bit,” he recalled. “I was still playing with Newington, but I graduated and accepted a position at Connecticut National Bank (CNB).”

Mike Schweighoffer, Vero Beach Dodgers, 1985.

That is, until fate intervened, in the form of longtime baseball scout Dick Teed of Windsor. Much to Schweighoffer’s shock, Teed offered him a contract with the Dodgers organization as an undrafted free agent. He signed the contract in late 1984, and resigned from the bank training program.

His first pro stop was Vero Beach in the Class-A Florida State League. Starting all 25 games in which he appeared, he posted a 10-11 record with an excellent 3.11 earned-run average. He was selected to the league all-star game, though he did not appear in the contest.

Hartford Courant article on Mike Schweighoffer by Tom Yantz, May 30, 1986.

The next season, Schweighoffer expected to play at Double-A San Antonio, and worked out with that club during most of spring training, but again fate intervened, this time in the form of Mother Nature.

“We had a few days of rain, and they needed someone to go to Melbourne for a game against the Twins,” he said. “I threw eight or nine pitches, all resulting in ground balls, and [San Antonio manager and former University of Hartford standout] Gary LaRocque said they wanted me in Triple-A. I didn’t believe it until the plane actually touched down in Albuquerque.”

Mike Schweighoffer, Albuquerque Dukes, 1986.

After skipping an entire level, Schweighoffer was used as a relief pitcher for most of the 1986 season, making 43 appearances. In the final month, the Dukes moved him back into the starting rotation, and he wound up with a 7-3 record.

His manager in Albuquerque was Terry Collins, who later piloted the New York Mets to the 2015 World Series. He also benefitted from a Connecticut connection.

“Terry was fiery and demanded a lot from the players, and Dave Wallace [of Waterbury] was a tremendous pitching coach,” he said.

1986 Albuquerque Dukes

Schweighoffer was asked to work on some new things during spring training in 1987, which he described as “mediocre.” He learned something during that training camp, however, which has stuck with him for more than three decades.

“Every day is a tryout, because no matter what you’re told, you still have to perform,” he said. “I use that to this day.”

Back under LaRocque in San Antonio, and converted again into a full-time starter, Schweighoffer posted a 4-4 record before being promoted back to Triple-A. Returning to Albuquerque meant returning to high elevations, and a switch back to the bullpen resulted in a 2-3 record and 5.33 ERA. The Dukes captured the Pacific Coast League title, which Schweighoffer dubbed one of the highlights of his professional playing career.


Mike Schweighoffer, Albuquerque Dukes, 1987.

The next spring, he was told he would be sent back to Double-A San Antonio, now guided by future Boston Red Sox skipper Kevin Kennedy. The Dodgers did not grant his request for a release, and he appeared in 43 games, including eight starts, with a 7-8 record and 3.96 ERA. At season’s end, he made the difficult decision to leave the game.

“I was 26 years old, had worked two winters at CNB and decided to give up playing,” he said. “I was also tired of dragging [his wife] Liz around the country.”


Mike Schweighoffer, San Antonio Missions, 1988.

With a number of former teammates making significant contributions, Los Angeles won the 1988 World Series in a shocking 4-game sweep of the heavily-favored Oakland Athletics. Despite never making it to the big dance, Schweighoffer said he had “absolutely zero bitterness and no regrets” about giving up the game.

“I got to pitch to Barry Bonds, Ken Caminiti, Sandy and Roberto Alomar,” he recalled. “Gary Sheffield took me deep one day; that ball is still rolling down I-10 in El Paso. I remember that at-bat like it was yesterday.”

He began working full-time at CNB in 1989, and is still active in the banking industry today. He is currently regional manager for commercial lending at People’s United Bank. He and Liz reside in Farmington, and they have three adult children – a daughter and twin boys.

Hartford Courant excerpt, 2008.

Despite having played professional baseball and being associated with some of the top stars in the game, Schweighoffer said his biggest baseball thrills came far away from any stadiums filled with paying customers.

“My best baseball memories are from Trinity, the Newington Capitols, coaching travel ball and Unionville American Legion, and being an assistant coach when my kids won Little League state titles in 2004 and 2005,” he said. “I just wanted to give back to the game.”

Original news article: https://patch.com/connecticut/farmington/meet-local-ex-pro-ballplayer-mike-schweighoffer-farmington

Other stories in this series:

GHTBL to Play 24-Game Regular Season in 2022

A 24-game Regular Season schedule is expected by GHTBL Executive Committee members and leagues mangers in 2022. Next season will get underway in mid-May followed by a double-elimination tournament that usually wraps up by mid-August.

In the meantime, GHTBL franchises will be recruiting players from colleges, high schools, AAU and Legion programs and from local communities. You do not have to live in Greater Hartford to play in the league. No age requirements. The GHTBL is an amateur nonprofit organization. Players do not get paid.

You can fill out a player application by clicking here.

All the best wishes and have a great holiday season,

GHTBL Executive Committee

Bill Holowaty, President
Andy Baylock, Vice President
Marc Levin, Treasurer
Wes Ulbrich, Secretary

Jack Rich, Most Valuable Player of 2021

Back in September of this year, outfielder/relief pitcher, Jack Rich of the Record-Journal Expos was unanimously voted Most Valuable Player of the Regular Season by league managers. The Expos were 10-8 on the season and 3-2 in the playoff tournament. Jack batted an impressive .475 while appearing in all 18 games with the Meriden-based franchise. In 59 at bats, he had 28 hits, 9 runs, a home run, 22 RBI and a league-leading 9 doubles. He also pitched 9 innings in relief. Jack has been a mainstay for the Expos since 2019.

Jack Rich, OF/P, Record-Journal Expos, 2020.
Jack Rich, OF/P, Record-Journal Expos, 2019.
Jack Rich, OF/P, Record-Journal Expos, 2020.
Jack Rich, OF/P, Record-Journal Expos, 2019.
Jack Rich featured in Record-Journal, 2021.

Jack Rich grew up in South Meriden, Connecticut, playing baseball and basketball. He’s a graduate of Wilcox Technical High School and now attends Eastern Connecticut State University. As a key part of the Warriors baseball team, Jack has compiled a .315 batting average with 4 home runs, 49 RBI and a .399 on base percentage thus far during his college career. He will begin his senior year this coming spring, seeking a Little East Conference title and a Division-III College World Series.

Jack Rich makes the All-Star team, 1997.

2021 GHTBL Award Winners

The following 2021 Regular Season and Playoff Tournament awards were either achieved and/or voted on by league managers:

Frank McCoy Award, Most Valuable Player – Jack Rich, OF, Record-Journal Expos

Mike Liappes Award, Most Valuable Pitcher – Matt Curtis, P, Vernon Orioles

Hal Lewis Award, Most Versatile Player – Evan Chamberlain, P/3B, Rainbow Graphics &

AJ Hendrickson, P/C, Record-Journal Expos

Gene Johnson Award, Regular Season Batting Champion – Jack Rich, OF, Record-Journal Expos

James Gallagher Award, Rookie of the Year – Matt Curtis, P, Vernon Orioles

Jack Repass Award, Golden Glove – Corey Plasky, IF, East Hartford Jets

Bill Chapulis Award, Home Run Title – Mike Munson, OF, Malloves Jewelers

Mark and Jane Foss Award, RBI Leader – Jack Rich, OF, Record-Journal Expos

Ralph Giansanti Sr. Award, Stolen Base Title – Christian Boudreau, IF, Hartford Colts

Rev. Thomas Campion Award, Outstanding Playoff Hitter – Chris Bogan, 1B, East Hartford Jets

Mike Abbruzzese Award, Outstanding Playoff Pitcher – Bryan Albee, P, East Hartford Jets

Jake Banks Trophy, Regular Season Champion – Jack Ceppetelli, Manager, Vernon Orioles

Jack Rose Trophy, Playoff Champion – Taylor Kosakowski, Manager, East Hartford Jets

The Hartford Twilight League Founder Who Brought Baseball To Bermuda

When Hartford was known as the Queen City of New England, the kingpin of its sports scene was Harry N. Anderson. He was a promoter of athletics and a member of the United States Olympic Committee. Anderson established dozens of baseball leagues including the Hartford Twilight League in 1929. Most notably, he arranged the first amateur game played on foreign soil, a feat that landed his Hartford-based team in the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

Harry N. Anderson, 1906.

Born on February 5, 1885, Harry Anderson was the son of Danish immigrants. His father, Jeef H. “Dave” Anderson was an engineer at Underwood Typewriter. His mother, Mary C. Smedgaard died at 27, before young Harry’s first birthday. He came of age in the working class neighborhood of Frog Hollow where baseball was immensely popular. In 1899, Anderson earned his high school degree from the Brown School on Market Street in Hartford.

Harry N. Anderson (standing, right – mislabeled in caption) and the Christ Church Crusaders, Hartford, 1906.

Anderson organized his first baseball league, Hartford’s Church League, in the summer of 1904. Teams came from Church of the Good Shepherd, Trinity Church, St. John’s Episcopal and Christ Church. He was Church League president and player-manager of the Christ Church Crusaders. The league hosted annual awards banquet at Caldwell Hart Colt Memorial Parish House, frequently attended by Mayor William F. Henney and Gustave Fischer, organizer of the Factory League. Fischer owned a department store in Hartford, where Anderson gained employment selling sporting goods.

Caldwell Hart Colt Memorial Parish House, 1907
Gustave Fischer, Hartford businessman and sports promoter, 1907.

While in charge of the Church League, Anderson began a new entity called the Fraternal Baseball League in 1907. The loop had eight entries: YMCA, Masons, Elks, Moose, Red Men, Royal Arcanum, Knights of Columbus, Oddfellows and Pythias. Anderson was league president and part-time umpire. Games were played at the baseball field at Trinity College and on the newly established skin diamonds at Colt Park. When summer ended, he coordinated the Fraternal Bowling League made up of the same benevolent organizations.

Baseball field at Trinity College, Hartford, Connecticut, 1907.

Harry Anderson was a man of many talents, personal connections and fraternal organizations. He obtained memberships with the Freemasons, the International Order of Odd Fellows and the Modern Woodman. Anderson was a charter member of Hartford’s Young Men’s Christian Association (YMCA) and president of the Laymen’s Association at Christ Church. He often directed and starred in musical performances in Hartford and East Hartford. Anderson gave singing performances and could play the cornet. In 1909, he was nominated for City Council of Hartford’s Ninth Ward by Republican electors, but he declined the nomination.

Harry N. Anderson, 1908.

Instead, Anderson dutifully joined the City Guard and the Governor’s Foot Guard. At a meeting at the State Armory In 1909, he formed Hartford’s Military Baseball League. Delegates from the First Infantry, Second Division, Naval Militia and Connecticut National Guard were in attendance. Lieutenant R. J. Goodman was elected league president and Romie B. Kuehns was made secretary. The Military Baseball League played every Saturday at Colt Park. Company H won the pennant and later accepted a championship trophy in a ceremony at the State Armory.

R. J. Goodman, President, Military Baseball League, 1909.
Romie B. Kuehns, Secretary, Military Baseball League, 1909.

Anderson was a constant in Hartford’s Republican Party for more than forty years. In 1910, he was master of ceremonies for Charles A. Goodwin’s gubernatorial campaign. However, Anderson spent more time pursuing athletics over politics. That same year, a local pitcher named Mike Sherman wrote an open letter in the Hartford Courant demanding a league to determine a city champion amongst the amateurs. Subsequently, the City Amateur Baseball League took shape. John Gunshanan, a former minor leaguer, was appointed president. Anderson was vice president. Hartford’s top players competed for the first City Amateur League title in 1911.

Charles A. Goodwin, 1910.
John Gunshanan, 1910.

On July 4, 1911, thousands of Hartford residents celebrated Independence Day by flocking to Colt Park and Pope Park for City Amateur League games. At season’s end, Anderson planned a grand banquet at Hotel Vendome, featuring dignitaries like Mayor Edward L. Smith. The Hartford mayor reported that 1,431 permits were issued for baseball games in the city parks and that 100,000 people attended the games. Senators Edward W. Hooker presented Manager O’Connor of the Laurels with the City Amateur League trophy. Congressman Tom Reilly, owner of the Hartford Senators, James H. Clarkin and major leaguer “Big Ed” Walsh were expected but were unable to attend.

Hotel Vendome, Hartford, Connecticut, (c.) 1910.

Early in 1912, Anderson was busy as president of the Hartford Amateur Basketball League and the Fraternal Bowling League. Then, to the surprise of many, he chartered a trip for Bermuda to promote tourism and amateur baseball. He first traveled alone via the Steam Ship Oceana from New York City to Bermuda’s capital of Hamilton. When he arrived, Anderson sent postcards to his sponsors: Gustave Fischer and a travel agent named H. R. Gridley. Anderson hatched plans for a series between Bermudans and an all-star team from Hartford.

S. S. Oceana, New York-Bermuda Service, 1912.

When a reporter learned of the Bermuda excursion, he quipped that Anderson had probably organized an island police force because, “He regards as lost each week that he does not organize something.” Anderson came back to Hartford and described Bermuda as having a fine venue for baseball. According to his boss Gustave Fischer, Anderson was the most popular man in the city because his telephone was inundated by players seeking a trip to Bermuda. Anderson and manager Luke J. Crowe recruited Hartford’s best available amateurs to what was called the All-City League team. In the wintry weeks before their departure, the players conditioned and stretched their limbs at the State Armory.

Bermuda Invaders (Hartford All Stars) photographed in 1912.

On a snowy morning, Anderson and a group of twelve young men left Hartford’s Union Station en route for New York. Workers at Royal Typewriter waved and shouted goodbye from their factory windows. The team boarded the S. S. Oceana for a 48-hour voyage to Bermuda on March 8, 1912. To entertain players and passengers, Anderson orchestrated musical performances on the ship. When they reached the island, the Hartford men checked into the Imperial Hotel and strolled to the Hamilton Grounds—a cricket pitch that would double as a baseball field.

Cricket at the Hamilton Grounds, Bermuda, 1912.

Hartford’s All City League team opposed a club comprised of native Bermudans, hotel staff and ex-professionals of the International League. The initial matchup of the series became the first baseball game played by American amateurs outside of the United States. Hartford lost four of seven games to the Bermudans, but the team returned home as celebrities. Anderson’s all-star team became known as the “Bermuda Invaders” and their expedition encouraged the New York Yankees to host spring training there the following year.

Bermuda Invaders, 1912.

A well-traveled Harry Anderson reorganized the City Amateur League in 1912. At a meeting at the Workingmen’s Club Rooms on Affleck Street, the loop was split into two divisions; senior and junior. Eight clubs vied for the title including the Imperials who had several players from the Bermuda Invaders. Mayor Louis R. Cheney was appointed president and Anderson was vice president. Anderson was made marshal of the league’s Opening Day parade wherein fans cheered on managers, players and umpires who rode in automobiles to the field at Trinity College.

Harry N. Anderson, Vice President, City Amateur League, 1912.
Mayor Louis R. Cheney, President, City Amateur League, 1912.

Before throwing out the ceremonial first pitch, Mayor Cheney bestowed upon Anderson a set of resolutions commending his successful journey to Bermuda. By the end of the City Amateur League season, the Imperials seized first place in the Senior division, while the Campfields won the Junior division. A league-wide banquet at Harry Bond’s Cafe featured music by Bond’s Orchestra, introductory remarks by Anderson and a toast from State Senator Edward W. Hooker. The following year, Anderson installed Senator Hooker as honorary league president.

Harry Bond’s Cafe, Hartford, Connecticut, 1912.
State Senator Edward W. Hooker, 1913.

In 1913, Anderson and the Bermuda Invaders were featured in Spalding’s Official Metropolitan Base Ball Book. By then, Anderson was a beloved figure in Hartford and Connecticut’s most accomplished sports promoter. Therefore, when the Connecticut State League was organized, he was unanimously voted in as president. Unlike previous professional iterations of the Connecticut State League, this version was considered a semi-professional league. Seven contending clubs hailed from Hartford, New Britain, Manchester, Wallingford, Windsor Locks and Winsted. Wallingford captured the league’s inaugural pennant.

Harry N. Anderson in Spalding’s Official Metropolitan Base Ball Book, 1913.
Spalding’s Official Metropolitan Base Ball Book, 1913.
Spalding’s Official Metropolitan Base Ball Book, 1913.

Anderson assembled another extravagant banquet for the Hartford’s amateur baseball community on October 30, 1913. Players and managers attended a night to remember at Bond’s Cafe where each table was decorated by electric light. Distinguished guests like former governor, Morgan G. Bulkeley and curveball pioneer, Candy Cummings gave accounts of their baseball careers. Mayor Louis R. Cheney welcomed special guest Danny Murphy, captain catcher of Connie Mack’s Philadelphia Athletics. After dinner, speakers noted Hartford’s great vigor for the national game and championship clubs were presented with loving cups (trophies).

Morgan G. Bulkeley, 1913.
Candy Cummings, 1913.
Danny Murphy, 1913.

The City Amateur League and the Connecticut State League were operated simultaneously by Harry Anderson in 1914, though his annual banquet stole headlines. At Hotel Garde, the United Baseball Leagues of Hartford celebrated their seasons. Cups were presented to the pennant winners of the Fraternal League, Insurance League, Public Schools, City Amateur and Junior City leagues. The Franklin club, led by Manager Crowe and other members of the Bermuda Invaders won the City Amateur League title. The banquet was described at length in the Hartford Courant which adulated Anderson for his energy, “…in promoting the amateur leagues of the city, Chairman Anderson has a warm spot in the hearts of all the followers of the game in Hartford.”

Franklin Baseball Club, City Amateur League Champions, 1914.

In 1915, the Connecticut State League and President Anderson faced a crisis. First place Meriden and second place Torrington were dissatisfied with road game attendance. To draw more ticket sales, the two clubs withdrew from the league and planned a series of games with Winsted. Despite his efforts, Anderson was unable to hold the league together and the State League disbanded on August 29, 1915. Remaining team managers voted for Winsted as State League champions. A few weeks later, Anderson presented Winsted with the Gustave Fischer trophy at Gilbert Field.

Baseball at Colt Park, Hartford, 1913.
Harry N. Anderson, 1915

During baseball’s offseason, Anderson continued to organize and compete in the Fraternal Bowling League. He also arranged a boxing match for Hartford’s welterweight title. Anderson had become synonymous with Hartford sporting events, and his popularity reached new heights when Courant Cigars used his name in advertisements. The following year, he would be re-elected president of the Connecticut State League while remaining vice president of the City Amateur League.

Harry Anderson in Courant Cigar advertisement, 1915.
City Amateur League trophy, 1915.

In April of 1916, Anderson and members of the Bermuda Invaders celebrated the fifth anniversary of their expedition. The group officially formed the Original Bermuda Invaders Last Man’s Brotherhood to commemorate the feat. An article in the Hartford Courant stated: “The organization is probably the most unique in the annals of amateur sports. The sporting event was one of the greatest attempted by amateurs in the promotion of the great national game.” At that time, a trip to Bermuda was still considered a rarity.

Babe Clark, Hartford, 1916.
Rex Islieb, Hartford, 1916.
Roster of the Bermuda Invaders, 1916.

Harry Anderson was a voracious supporter of fraternal organizations and in summer of 1916, he created the Masonic Baseball League. The circuit was composed of Masonic lodges throughout Connecticut. As for his duties in Hartford, he was chairman of Hartford’s new Fourth of July Baseball Committee. His legwork led to well-attended benefit games in Colt Park aiding American troops in the Mexican Border War. The round robin series culminated with the Hartford Tigers beating Pratt & Whitney Company for the cup.

Yates, Hartford Tigers, City Amateur League, 1916.
Players in Hartford’s Industrial League, 1916.

While manufacturing boomed in Hartford due to World War I, the city’s Industrial Baseball League became immensely popular. As the loop’s part-time promoter, Anderson penned an article for Spalding’s Official Base Ball Guide of 1917 featuring four pages on the Industrial League amateurs. After the United States entered the war on April 6, 1917, Anderson hosted benefit games for Clark Griffith’s Bat and Ball Fund. The national campaign gifted baseball equipment to soldiers of the American Expeditionary Forces (AEF) in Europe.

Inside cover of Spalding’s Base Ball Guide, 1917.

At the amateur banquet of 1917, Anderson, for his conscientious work in the success of Hartford baseball, was gifted a box seat ticket to each World Series game held in New York. As the Chicago White Sox defeated the New York Giants at Brush Stadium, Anderson met with Clark Griffith to donate Hartford’s $30 check to the Bat and Ball Fund. Griffith later sent a letter addressed to the “Amateur Baseball Fraternity” of Hartford, and expressed his thanks writing, “I assure you it is appreciated and will be put to good use.”

Hartford Courant excerpt, 1917.
Clark Griffith, Manager, Washington Senators, 1917.

That winter, Anderson became president of the Industrial Bowling League, vice president of the Church Bowling League and captain of the Freemasons team in the Fraternal Bowling League. Sports of all kinds were interrupted in 1918, and Anderson prepared to support the allied war effort. He was recruited by Christopher Scaife of the YMCA to be a recreation supervisor in England and France. Anderson was to serve thousands of American troops in an auxiliary capacity by staging athletic competitions and live entertainment. Even though an armistice was reached on November 11, 1918, many Americans participated in military activities in Europe until 1923.

Officers of the Church Bowling League of Hartford, 1918.

Before active duty with the YMCA, Anderson hosted another Fourth of July celebration at Colt Park starring a team of Navy sailors from Hartford. Then, Anderson completed training courses in Springfield, Massachusetts, and French classes at Columbia University. He shipped out to Europe in December of 1918, sending greetings from Winchester, England, upon his arrival. In Winchester, he was stationed at Morn Hill Troop Transit Camp, a 50,000-man base near the port of Southhampton. Here, Anderson facilitated athletic contests, comedic routines and musical performances to boost morale of deploying troops and those returning from the Western Front.

Navy Sailors from Hartford with Harry N. Anderson, 1918.
Morn Hill Troop Transit Camp, Winchester, England, 1918.
Morn Hill Troop Transit Camp, Winchester, England, 1918.

On New Years Day, 1919, Anderson was in Paris, France, to meet friends from home and unintentionally began a long-lasting tradition. He reserved a lavish dinner at Hotel Regina for twelve civilians from Hartford serving as attachés to the AEF. Among the guests was Daniel D. Bidwell, a war correspondent who held the record for circumventing the globe in less than 47 days. The group adopted the name “Hartford Exiles” because of their auxiliary status. The Exiles pledged to hold annual New Years reunions back home, where the group became a prominent fraternal order into which qualified members were initiated each year.

Hotel Regina, Paris, France, 1919.

While in France, Anderson spent most of his time stationed in the province of Brittany at the coastal town of Dinard. It was a place of rest and relaxation for weary soldiers and sailors. Anderson arrived in Dinard during February of 1919, and he quickly became known for his continuous program of baseball games on the beach, boxing bouts, stunt nights, concerts and comedy routines promoted on the bulletin of the Grand Casino. Anderson mailed a game-used baseball back to Hartford from a contest won by the 26th Infantry “Yankee Division.” In his letter, Anderson wrote that the ball would be “ammunition” for Hartford’s part in the United States Victory Loan campaign.

The beach at Grand Casino, Dinard, France, 1919.

Anderson received praise and letters of appreciation for his exemplary service as recreation supervisor in France. When he put together a final track meet between American and French soldiers, the French Commander of Dinard, Colonel Garson presented Anderson with a gold medallion. Before leaving Dinard for the port city of Brest, the Mayor of Dinard awarded Anderson with a citation for “promoting Franco-American relations.” Towards the end of his duties in France, Anderson represented the State of Connecticut while visiting several military cemeteries near the front lines of the war.

The 26th Infantry Division baseball team, Dinard, France, 1919.

One of Anderson’s greatest accomplishments came at the Inter-Allied Games. The multi-sport event commenced on June 22, 1919, at the newly constructed Pershing Stadium on the outskirts of Paris, France. Anderson collaborated with YMCA, AEF and French officials to arrange and promote the games. Competitions included track and field, swimming, soccer, baseball, wrestling, hand-grenade throwing and others. The games were open solely to men who served in the war. Around 1,500 athletes participated from 18 different countries. Following the games, Pershing Stadium, a 25,000-seat facility was gifted to the people of France by the United States.

Postcard promoting the Inter-Allied Games, 1919.
An Inter-Allied Games ticket, Pershing Stadium, Paris, France, 1919.
About Inter-Allied Games, Pershing Stadium, Paris, France, 1919.
Pershing Stadium, Joinville-Le-Pont, Paris, France, 1919.

Anderson came home to Hartford in August of 1919. When he resumed civilian life, he gave talks to Hartford audiences about his experiences in Europe. Next, he was invited to Washington D.C. by Congressman Augustine Lonergan where Anderson advocated for and witnessed the passage of a bill incorporating the American Legion. Then, he was offered a position in Poland by the YMCA, but Anderson had other plans. An affection for Hartford and a fervor for sports promotion led him to establish the Anderson Sporting Goods Company at 721 Main Street—a business that would last until the 1940’s.

Congressman Augustine Lonergan, Connecticut, 1919.
Harry N. Anderson returns to Hartford after the war, 1919.

On New Years Day of 1920, the Hartford Exiles commemorated their Paris dinner with the same four-course meal at Hotel Garde on Asylum Street. Anderson was affectionately appointed “Commandant” of the Exiles and Governor of Connecticut Everett J. Lake was initiated as an honorary member. Around that time, Anderson also served as business manager of the Christ Church newsletter, the “Evangelist” and was vice president of the Inter-church Basketball League. He then introduced the Hartford County Baseball League in the springtime. The new loop fielded teams from Hartford, Bloomfield, Glastonbury, Wethersfield, Windsor and Simsbury, who won the inaugural title.

Hartford Exiles at Hotel Garde, Hartford, Connecticut – L to R: Fred B. Innes, James E. Rhodes, Harry N. Anderson, Michael J. Morkan, William H. Vennart and Daniel D. Bidwell, 1920.
Simsbury, Hartford County Baseball League champions, 1920.

At the end of the summer of 1920, Anderson plotted a best-of-three charity baseball series at Trinity College. He persuaded the Hartford Police Department and the Hartford Fire Department to matchup against each other. The municipal bodies played to benefit Camp Courant, Times Farm and the Home for Crippled Children in Newington, Connecticut. Sergeant John M. Henry, a former outfielder for John McGraw’s New York Giants, was player-manager for the Hartford Police. Hartford Fire earned two wins to take the series. In the winter of 1920, Anderson also experimented with a short-lived roller polo league (similar to hockey) based in Hartford.

A cartoon depicting Anderson sparking a rivalry between Hartford Police and Hartford Fire, 1920.
Hartford Fire Department baseball club, 1920.

In 1921, Anderson opted for regional sports as head of the Hartford County Basketball League and the Hartford County Baseball League. He also became president of the Municipal Service Baseball League while assisting other amateur loops like the City Independent League and the Allied Insurance and Bankers League. In November, Anderson was invited back to Washington D.C. to represent Hartford at the burial of the Unknown Soldier at Arlington National Cemetery. Around the holidays, he attended a Christmas dinner at the State Armory dressed as Santa Claus, amusing over seven hundred military veterans.

Burial of the Unknown Soldier, Arlington Cemetery, 1921.
Harry N. Anderson (center, dressed as Santa Claus) at Christmas Dinner at Connecticut State Armory, 1921.

The following year, Anderson once again played a critical part in Hartford’s Independence Day celebrations. This time, he helped to organize a relay race dubbed the Courant Marathon. The footrace started at Duke of Cumberland Inn (John Robbins House) on Old Main Street in Rocky Hill where George Washington had stayed during the American Revolution. The finish line was set in front of Connecticut’s Old State House. Anderson and Mayor Richard J. Kinsella were judges of Hartford’s first large-scale footrace.

Mayor Richard J. Kinsella issues special permit for Hartford Courant Marathon, 1922.
Mayor Richard J. Kinsella and Harry N. Anderson present Hartford Courant Marathon trophies at the Old State House, 1922.

In 1923, Anderson served as general chairman of Hartford’s annual Bowling Carnival, an event he had begun two years prior. Hundreds of bowlers competed from morning to midnight at Casino Alley on Asylum Street. The carnival honored George Washington’s birthday and amassed $420 for Camp Courant, Times Farm and the Newington Home for Crippled Children. In May, Anderson appeared in city court only to lose a lawsuit against the Connecticut Boulevard Amusement Company over a complete set of baseball equipment worth $187. When summer arrived, he presided over the Insurance-Bankers League and sat on the committee of the next Courant Marathon.

Hartford Courant Marathon, 1923.

Harry Anderson’s Danish-born father, Jeef H. “Dave” Anderson passed away at 80 years old on August 1, 1923. Perhaps to remember his father, Anderson invited to Hartford a renowned gymnastics instructor from Denmark named Niels Bukh and his team of athletes. Once referred to as the “Walter Camp of Europe” Bukh was a Danish national hero for his advancements in physical education. Anderson oversaw Bukh’s performance at the State Armory featuring thirty gymnasts stretching and contorting in unison. He praised Bukh for, “…producing a remarkable type of athlete from the most unpromising material as was evidenced at the Antwerp Olympic Games.”

Niel Bukh’s Danish Gymnasts at State Armory, Hartford, Connecticut, 1923

Then, in recognition of Armistice Day, Anderson recited an original poem on the radio entitled “We’ve Come Back to You.” On New Year’s Day, 1924, he was toastmaster of the Hartford Exiles’ sixth reunion at Hotel Garde. After organizing another profitable Bowling Carnival, Anderson learned of his appointment to the United States Olympic Committee. He graciously accepted and planned to attend the 1924 Olympics in Paris. Anderson witnessed the United States achieve a medal count of 32, nearly twice that of the next country, Finland. While in France, Anderson revisited Dinard, where he received a royal welcome and was awarded the Legion of Honor; France’s highest distinction first established by Napoleon Bonaparte in 1802.

Harry N. Anderson (right) and the Hartford Exiles, 1924.
Stade Olympique de Colombes, Paris, 1924.

When he returned home, Anderson reported that 45 nations competed with sportsmanship. He predicted international amity among nations would arise from the Olympics. In 1925, Anderson’s experience earned him a new role as Hartford County commissioner of the Amateur Athletic Union (AAU). He sent Hartford’s Dixie basketball team to a national tournament in Kansas City. However, Anderson was discovered to have broken AAU gifting rules and was fired. His ousting was a rare public embarrassment, but he quickly bounced back as President of the Farmington Valley Baseball League and the Farmington Valley Basketball League.

Anderson Sporting Goods Co advertisement, 1924.

In 1926, a former member of the Bermuda Invaders and associate editor of the Terre Haute Star, Frank A. Hollis offered Anderson a change of scenery as recreation director in Terre Haute, Indiana. However, Anderson stayed loyal to Hartford and dove into recreating the City Independent League. He leaned on league secretary and chief umpire, Walter Elliot to conduct administrative duties. Eight baseball clubs manned by Hartford’s top amateurs took to the diamonds in Colt Park. Mayor Norman Stevens tossed the ceremonial first pitch at Opening Day and by the end of the season, the New Departure Endees of Elmwood had won their second straight championship.

Hartford Exiles at Hotel Garde, Hartford, Connecticut, 1926.
Walter Elliot and Harry N. Anderson of the City Independent League, 1926.

Harry Anderson, a true jack-of-all-trades, was re-elected president of the Syria Grotto Band in 1927. The band was comprised of some of the best jazz musicians in Hartford. Anderson’s artistic pursuits, athletic promotions and sporting goods store made him one of the city’s most publicized figures. In many respects, Hartford relied on Anderson for his skillful leadership. He was a busy man, but always found time for annual gatherings like the fifteenth anniversary banquet of the Bermuda Invaders and the seventh annual Charity Bowling Carnival at the Hartford YMCA.

YMCA Bowling Alley, Hartford, 1927.
Charity Bowling Carnival, Hartford, 1927.

In late May of 1927, Anderson arranged a parade down Main Street to celebrate the national game. The event was known as Hartford Boys’ Baseball Day and featured a special guest: Commissioner of Major League Baseball Judge Kenesaw Mountain Landis attended the parade, sat near the finish line at the Hartford Times Building and watched 5,000 marching youngsters. Landis wished the Hartford boys, “…all the luck in the world, but bear in mind, that a good sport plays according to the rules, and to some extent, makes his own luck.” Also on hand for the festivities were Mayor Norman Stevens, former ace of the Cincinnati Reds Stockings, George Wright, owner of the Hartford Senators, James H. Clarkin and President of the Eastern League, Herman J. Weisman. 

Judge Kenesaw Mountain Landis, 1925 (c.)
G. Fox advertisement in the Hartford Courant, 1927.

Later that year, Harry Anderson founded the World Series Club, an organization still in operation today. Anderson was an avid attendee of the World Series since 1917. While attending the 1927 series, Anderson and nineteen other Hartford men formed the club at Hotel Knickerbocker in New York City. Membership was open to Hartford residents who had attended at least one World Series. Club members included Mayor Norman Stevens, Art B. McGinley, Hartford Times sports editor, Albert W. Keane, Hartford Courant sports editor and Raymond Rutledge, a former pitcher of the Cleveland Indians. As for the outcome of the World Series, Babe Ruth and Lou Gerhig of “Murderer’s Row” swept the Pittsburgh Pirates in four games to propel the Yankees to a world championship.

Hotel Knickerbocker, New York, New
York, 1927.
Paul Waner, Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig and Lloyd Waner at the 1927 World Series.

Anderson then became president and part-time referee of the Farmington Valley Basketball League in early 1928. He chaired a committee to bring two hundred track and field athletes to the State Armory in mid-March, for the Massasoit Athletic Club Track Meet. At the event, Olympic sprinter Frank Hussey cracked the World Record for the 70-yard dash. By April, Anderson announced his intentions to direct Hartford’s Bankers Baseball League with Walter Elliot as his right-hand man. Arrangements were made at Anderson Sporting Goods and disseminated to the Hartford Courant and Hartford Times.

Knights of Lithuania, Farmington Valley Basketball League champions, 1928.
Indoor Track Meet at State Armory, Hartford, 1928.
State Armory, Hartford, Connecticut, 1928 (c.)

Before baseball season got underway, Anderson and members of the World Series Club welcomed to the city, new owners of the Hartford Senators. On Opening Day, April 18, 1928 at Bulkeley Stadium, Anderson presented the Eastern League club with a horseshoe-shaped floral bouquet. The flowers were thought to have given the Senators good fortune in their win over the Bridgeport Bears. A few weeks later, Anderson arranged the Farmington Valley Baseball League consisting of teams from Simsbury, New Britain, Windsor, East Hartford, East Glastonbury and Thompsonville.

In July of 1928, Harry Anderson was given a post on the American Olympic Committee. Anderson was a key member of the United States team’s statistical staff. He traveled from Hoboken, New Jersey aboard the Steam Ship Veendam of the Holland-American line to Amsterdam, Netherlands. He represented Hartford overseas for 16 days at the Summer Games. The 1928 Amsterdam Olympics marked the first continuous lighting of the Olympic Flame. On his return, Anderson received a testimonial dinner at Hotel Garde put on by local luminaries. Mayor Walter E. Batterson presided as toastmaster and lauded Anderson for his 25 years of service to Hartford sports.

Summer Olympics, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 1928.
Betty Robinson, a 16-year-old American high school student, wins the 100-meter Dash at Summer Olympics, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 1928.

On New Years Day, 1929, Anderson and the Hartford Exiles marked their tenth anniversary at The Hartford Club on Prospect Street. It was the first Exiles dinner at which wives of members were allowed to attend. Perhaps Anderson’s most notable accomplishment of 1929 was his participation at the fourteenth National Convention of Disabled American Veterans of War, a cause for which he cared deeply. He also remained chairman of the charity Bowling Carnival benefitting Camp Courant, a day camp for Hartford children.

City Bank Baseball, Hartford, Connecticut, 1929.
Hartford Delegates at the National Convention of Disabled American Veterans of World War, 1929.

Harry Anderson, Hartford’s unofficial patriarch of amateur baseball, took charge of Hartford’s Public Service Baseball League in 1929. At the start of July, he formed a new iteration of the City Independent Twilight League in a meeting at Anderson’s Sporting Goods. Teams competed at Colt Park on Tuesdays and Thursdays using “Spalding official rules” to govern the league. Hartford’s best teams participated such as: the Wolverines, McKinley Athletics, Holy Name, Economy Grocery, Bill Battey’s Spartans and Cardinal Athletic Club. Anderson was first president of the loop that eventually evolved into today’s Greater Hartford Twilight Baseball League.

Harry N. Anderson, President of Public Service Baseball League, 1929.

At 45 years old, Anderson was a loyal patriot with enthusiasm for serving his community. In return for his 25 years of dedication to athletics in Hartford, city officials and dignitaries threw Anderson a testimonial dinner at Hotel Garde. On November 18, 1929, seven organized baseball leagues made up for most of the 175 dinner guests. Mayor Walter Batterson acted as toastmaster and famous football official Ed Thorp was keynote speaker. Other attendees included boxing star, Bat Battalino and Hartford Senators outfielder, Skee Watson. Anderson made an address of appreciation, and then handed out official Spalding trophies to the winners of each amateur league.

Harry N. Anderson’s 25 Years of Hartford Sports Anniversary Jubilee, 1929.

In 1930, Anderson became director of the Camp Courant Fund. Along with athletics and entertainment, fundraising for Camp Courant was Anderson’s life’s work. Nearly every year from 1920 until his passing in 1954, Anderson served as chairman of the annual Charity Bowling Carnival, directly benefiting the children at Camp Courant. Afterwards, he resumed responsibilities for the United States Olympic Committee. Anderson and committee members convened on Washington D.C. to devise plans for the 1932 Olympics in Los Angeles, California.

Hartford Exiles banquet at Hotel Garde, 1930.
Charity Bowling Carnival, Hartford, Connecticut, 1930.
Syria Grotto Band, 1930.
Industrial League Opening Day, John Borrup General Superintendent of Pratt & Whitney Co. and Harry N. Anderson (right), Colt Park, Hartford, May 22, 1930.
Harry N. Anderson (third from left), United States Olympic Committee, Washington D.C. 1930.

An increasingly busy Anderson turned over president duties role of the Hartford Twilight League to John A. Barrett after one year. The Savitt Gems became city champions of 1930 by defeating Holy Name at Bulkeley Stadium. At the Gems victory banquet, players listened to a congratulatory speech from Anderson while enjoying a lobster dinner. Bill Savitt was awarded with the championship trophy while each player received championship rings. The Gems would go on to become Hartford’s most revered semi-professional team until 1945.

1930 Savitt Gems

That same summer, Anderson had made arrangements with a previous contact: Washington’s owner Clark Griffith. They scheduled a benefit game between the Washington Senators and a team of Eastern League All-Stars on September 23, 1930. Prices were 75 cents for grandstand seating, 50 cents for bleachers and 25 cents for children. Ticket proceeds were donated to the Hartford Chapter of Disabled American Veterans. Famous showmen Al Schacht and Nick Altrock were also on hand to perform comedy routines between innings.

1930 Washington Senators

Amid the Great Depression, Anderson’ philanthropic attitude persisted in Hartford and beyond. In February of 1931, over 700 bowlers entered Anderson’s Charity Blowing Carnival. The biggest attraction of the event was the women’s team from Albany, New York, who defeated a picked team of men from the Hartford Big Pin League. The proceeds of the carnival went to the care of underprivileged children of Camp Courant and Time Farm. A few months later, Anderson took part in the Connecticut Delegation at the 11th National Convention of Disabled Veterans of World War in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania.

23rd Annual Charity Bowling Carnival, 1931.
Connecticut Delegation to National Convention of Disabled Veterans of World War, 1931.

In August of 1931, Anderson showcased two former Olympic swimmers, Aileen Riggin and Helen Wainwright in Hartford. They competed at the pool at Capitol Park, an amusement park off of Wethersfield Avenue. One week later, Anderson accompanied two world champion boxers to meet the kids at Camp Courant; Christopher “Bat” Battalino, reigning world featherweight champion and Sammy Mandell, former lightweight champion. Anderson knew Battalino particularly well because it was Bat’s seventh consecutive visit to Camp Courant. The boxing pair awed campers with a boxing demonstration and their words of encouragement were met with loud three cheers.

Harry N. Anderson (second from left) at Camp Courant, 1931.
Bat Battalino Day at Camp Courant with Harry N. Anderson (center), 1931.

Next, Anderson was selected by former World Series champion Leslie Mann to the board of directors of the new United States Amateur Baseball Association, known today as the American Amateur Baseball Congress. Anderson was charged with determining Connecticut’s top amateur team of 1931 for a regional tournament at the Eastern States Exposition in West Springfield, Massachusetts. He directed a four team playoff at Bulkeley Stadium wherein the St. Paul’s Lutheran Church baseball club of Hartford were the victors. St. Paul’s, led by the Dixon brothers Robert, George and John, then beat an opponent from Stafford Springs to win the state title, but they would lose in the regional tournament.

Leslie Mann, United States Amateur Baseball Association. 1931.
St. Paul’s Luthern Church baseball team, Hartford, Connecticut, 1931.

On New Years Day, 1932, the Hartford Exiles celebrated their 13th reunion banquet at Hotel Garde. Soon thereafter, Anderson was planning for the 12th annual Bowling Carnival. In a progressive move, he invited women bowlers to join in on the action. Crack women teams from Albany, New York and Allentown, Pennsylvania, impressed the men. Anderson then named a woman to the Bowling Carnival committee; Mary E. J. Lally of the Hartford Courant. $214 was donated to Camp Courant on behalf of Anderson’s Bowling Carnival.

Hartford Exiles at Hotel Garde, Hartford, Connecticut, 1932.
Harry N. Anderson (center), Chairman of the 24th annual Bowling Carnival, Hartford, Connecticut, 1932.

In March of 1932, Anderson and the Bermuda Invaders toasted to their 20th anniversary. Most of the team attended the occasion and Lewis R. Cheney, Mayor of Hartford at the time of the trip, was guest of honor. Then in April, Anderson arranged basketball benefit games, bringing in $164 to the Mayor’s Unemployment Relief Fund. In May, Anderson leaned on his contacts with the United States Olympic Committee to expose Hartford to track and field stars of the day. He tapped Paul de Bruyn, a German athlete and the first international winner of the Boston Marathon to make a public appearance for the Travelers Men’s Club at “Sports Night” at Foot Guard Hall.

Charity Bowling Carnival Committee entertain as band at Camp Courant, 1932.

Then, in preparation of the 1932 Summer Games in Los Angeles, Anderson promoted the “Olympic Games Benefit Night” at Capitol Park. The event fundraised for the United States Olympic team and featured multiple state championship boxing matches. Governor of Connecticut Wilbur L. Cross attended as the guest of honor. On July 24, 1932, Anderson left for Los Angeles by train. After departing, he was followed by a contingent of young men traveling in a dilapidated truck. In Anderson, Hartford fans had a direct link to the Olympics.

American athletes of the Los Angeles Summer Olympics, 1932.

When Harry Anderson returned from Los Angeles, he told various gatherings about his Olympic experiences. He remarked that unexpected victories were the most thrilling of contests. Unanticipated outcomes of came when Helene Madison won three gold medals in swimming, Eddie Tolan earned two gold medals in sprinting and Babe Didrikson wrested two gold medals in javelin and hurdles. Also known as “Games of the X Olympiad” the 1932 Games marked the first Olympic Village built for athletes, which became a model for the future.

Babe Didrikson throwing javelin, Summer Olympics, Los Angeles, 1932.

The Summer Games were held from July 30 to August 15, 1932. Motion pictures from the games were distributed throughout the world. Anderson brought one of the films home to Hartford and screened it for clubs and fraternal organizations. Among the scenes depicted in the film was Tolan’s photo finish victory. Anderson recounted that the Olympiad turned a profit for the first time since Athens in 1896. During his presentations he also noted that Germany would host the Olympics in 1936, then Japan would bear the torch in 1940.

Americans, Ed Tolan (left) and Ralph Metcalfe (right) finish first and second in 100 meter dash, 1932.

In April of 1933, Anderson served as a pallbearer for his friend Ted WInis who passed away in a tragic automobile accident. Winis was a well-liked 3 year old Assistant Sports Editor of the Hartford Times. On a lighter note, Anderson was assigned a new task by the mayor a few weeks later. He headed Hartford’s welcome committee of an American aviator, Wiley Post; the first pilot to fly solo around the world. Anderson and a few thousand spectators enthusiastically welcomed Post and his plane the “Winnie Mae” at Brainard Field. Before the year’s end, Anderson presided over the largest assembly of the World Series Club to date at Hotel Wellington in New York City.

World Series Club annual banquet at Hotel Wellington, New York, New York, 1933.
Hotel Wellington, New York, New York, 1933.
Harry N. Anderson (third from right) delivers Christmas gifts to veterans, 1933.

Next, in 1934, Anderson traveled to Hot Springs, Arkansas for spring training. He accompanied Mickey Lambert, a scout from Unionville, Connecticut who often visited Hot Springs with the St. Paul Saints of the American Association owned by former Hartford Senators manager, Bob “Tom” Connery. Lambert was a personal friend of Babe Ruth, who began the concept of Spring Training in Hot Springs. No known record exists of Ruth meeting Anderson, though he would later represent Hartford at Ruth’s funeral. That summer, Anderson rallied a new City Independent League and recruited former mayor, Walter Batterson to be honorary president.

Ed Brown, Bill Savitt, Max Savitt & Harry N. Anderson award silver baseballs to Camp Courant All-Star team, 1934.
L to R: Mickey Lambert, Tom Connery and Harry N. Anderson Hot Springs, Arkansas, 1935.

While head of the City Independent League, Anderson acted as part-time umpire for old-timer games put on by Albert G. Kamm and his Yesteryear Stars. Meanwhile, Anderson also pursued improvements at Colt Park including a new baseball stadium. The City of Hartford approved park improvements at the behest of Anderson, police captain John Henry and umpire chief, John A. DeRidder. Construction of the stadium was funded by the New Deal’s Federal Emergency Relief Administration and overseen by Recreation Supervisor James H. Dillon. Municipal Stadium was completed in June of 1935 and later became known as Dillon Stadium after renovations in 1956.

John A. DeRidder, Hartford Umpire Chief, 1935.
Opening Day at Municipal Stadium, Colt Park, Hartford, Connecticut, 1935.

Anderson attended Opening Day at Municipal Stadium on June 29, 1935. Pregame ceremonies began with a parade led by Mayor Joseph W. Beach and Superintendent of Parks, George H. Hollister. Marching bands and ballplayers walked in formation from the new swimming pool to the new stadium where officials hoisted an American flag up a flagpole. Spectators witnessed the first Hartford Twilight League game of the season between the Tuckel Rhymers and Check Bread. The stadium had aprofessional caliber playing surface, large bleachers lining foul territory and high board fencing surrounding the outfield. In addition to baseball, the 5,000-person venue accommodated football games and track and field competitions.

Harry N. Anderson and volunteers deliver gifts to veterans, Hartford, Connecticut, 1935.

On March 11, 1936, the Connecticut River flooded, devastating Municipal Stadium and the city of Hartford. Anderson, the dean of Hartford sports, sprang into action. He headed a charity basketball tournament backed by Mayor Thomas J. Spellacy to collect donations for the Red Cross. In May, Anderson was named director of the Hartford County YMCA athletic organization. Then in June, he announced a $100 donation to Camp Courant from his annual Charity Bowling Carnival. Anderson fulfilled his many obligations while preparing for his role with the United States Olympic Committee at the upcoming games in Berlin, Germany.

Flooding of Connecticut River in Hartford, 1936.

Alongside the United States Olympic team, Anderson headed to Germany aboard the steamship Manhattan in New York City on July 15, 1936. The head of the United States Olympic Committee was the notorious Avery Brundage. During the voyage to Germany, some of the athletes engaged in drinking on board. The American favorite for the 100-meter backstroke, Eleanor Holm Jarrett was dismissed for excessive drinking, though she later accused Brundage of partiality. When the ship arrived in Hamburg, Anderson sent postcards to friends in Hartford, including a card to 600 kids at Camp Courant.

Harry N. Anderson (top, right), American Olympic Committee, Berlin, Germany, 1936.

The Berlin-based XI Olympiad began on August 1, 1936, and lasted fifteen days. Nazi Germany hosted the iconic Olympic Games where the world came to know Jesse Owens. The American track star won four gold medals and helped his relay team set a 400-meter world record. Harry Anderson endorsed Owens and the United States team as “the best ever.” He had positive words for Berlin as a hospitable and clean city. Unbeknownst to Anderson and attendees at the Berlin Games, Adolph Hitler and fascists in Europe would cause the catastrophe of World War II.

Jesse Owens, wins 4 gold medals at Berlin Olympics, 1936.
Harry N. Anderson (seated, left) at YMCA Olympic Dinner, Hartford, Connecticut, 1936.
United States team who earned 400-meter relay gold medal, 1936.

When he made it back to the United States, Anderson had motion pictures sent to Hartford so he could share his fourth Olympic Games. Now in his fifties, Anderson stayed busy by keeping up with friends, conducting annual and showing footage from the Berlin Olympics. Towards the end of 1936, he stepped down as president of the World Series Club. Shortly thereafter, he closed his sporting goods business and eyed retirement. He continued his charitable work with the Charity Bowling Carnival in 1937. The event was called the largest duckpin bowling tournament in the country. Weeks later, Anderson marked the twenty-fifth anniversary banquet of the Bermuda Invaders.

Harry N. Anderson (standing, center) at the annual Charity Bowling Carnival, Hartford, Connecticut, 1937.
Camp Courant baseball champions banqueting with Harry N. Anderson (seated, far right), 1937.

In the fall of 1937, Anderson assisted in the establishment a new organization dubbed Veteran Baseball Players Association. The group of players, managers, umpires and officials was created to promote and preserve the game while supporting aged baseball men experiencing poverty or illness. Members were required to be at least forty years of age. Former Hartford ballplayer Albert G. Kamm was elected president while Anderson was second in command. The Veteran Baseball Players Association hosted old-timers games, charitable events, banquets and conventions.

Harry N. Anderson, 1938.
L to R: Rudy C. Hansen, A.J. Clements and Harry N. Anderson discuss upcoming 1940 Olympics, Clarkhurst Ranch East Hampton, Connecticut, 1938.

By 1938, the veterans association had about 300 members in 14 different states. To promote the association, Anderson and Kamm assembled old-timer games. On one occasion, Anderson dressed up as Abner Doubleday, alleged founder of baseball, and umpired an old-timer game played in the nineteenth century style of the New York Knickerbockers. At another contest, former big leaguer “Big Ed” Walsh of Meriden, Connecticut, appeared with the Yesteryear Stars at Bulkeley Stadium. Eventually, the Wives and Daughters of Veteran Baseball Players Association was established to support women.

Harry N. Anderson, 1938.
Courant Championship Baseball Team at Hotel Bond with Bill Savitt and Harry N. Anderson, 1938.
“Big Ed” Walsh, 1938.

As part of baseball’s hundredth birthday of celebration in 1939, the ultimate distinction was bestowed upon Harry Anderson and the Bermuda Invaders. Bob Quinn, President of the National Baseball Hall of Fame invited them to a special ceremony in Cooperstown, New York. At the Hall of Fame, Quinn unveiled a citation declaring the Invaders the first amateur team to compete on foreign soil. Anderson handed over a team photograph taken in 1912 to curator William Beattie, who hung it on the wall. They were officially the first amateurs recognized by the Hall of Fame in baseball history.

Bob Quinn, Director, National Baseball Hall of Fame, 1939.
L to R: Rex Islieb, Charles Palmberg, William Beattie, Harry N. Anderson, Ted Marenholtz (captain), Mortimer Bacon and Adam Purves, Jr. – The Bermuda Invaders give team photograph to the National Baseball Hall of Fame, Cooperstown, New York, 1939.

Anderson’s Hall of Fame glory was a fitting capstone on his prolific baseball career. Even still, he sought out new objectives, impactful projects and timely crusades. Ever the humble and faithful servant to Hartford’s Christ Church Cathedral, he served on the Christ Church Cathedral campaign. Later, during the Christmas season of 1939, Anderson and other volunteers distributed gifts and food to Hartford’s war veterans. Throughout his adult life, he set aside time nearly every Christmas to deliver yule tidings, most often in a Santa Claus costume.

Harry N. Anderson (standing, right) part of the Christ Church Cathedral Campaign, 1939.
Harry N. Anderson (center) at Washington’s Birthday Charity Bowling Carnival at Capitol Alleys, Hartford, Connecticut, 1939.

Anderson began 1940 as toastmaster of the Hartford Exiles reunion. He welcomed Congressman William J. Miller of Connecticut’s First Congressional district to the Exiles. Miller was eligible to join the Exiles due to his service with the Aviation Section of the Signal Corps. during World War I. About a month later, Anderson and the Charity Bowling Carnival committee awarded gold watches to youngsters at Camp Courant for good citizenship. Later that year, Anderson assumed the role of Chairman for the Veteran Baseball Players Association. He delegated responsibility of the annual convention to association members in Torrington, Connecticut.

Congressman William J. Miller, 1939.
Hartford Exiles annual banquet, 1940.
Harry N. Anderson of the Hartford Exiles, 1940.
Mayor Spellacy and Harry N. Anderson visit Camp Courant, 1940.

Ongoing Nazi aggression abroad caused American communities like Hartford to react with shock and concern. Anderson and the Hartford Exiles were eerily reminded of the German menace of World War I. The Exiles initiated sitting Governor Raymond E. Baldwin into the order on New Years Day, 1941. Governor Baldwin gave an eloquent speech exclaiming, “America now needs our loyalty, our energy and our courage more than ever before; let us all go forward with courage, united.” The banquet drew a record number of attendees whom Anderson invited back to feast around the “H” shaped table for the ensuing year.

Hartford Exiles, 1941.
Raymond E. Baldwin, Governor of Connecticut, 1941.

During the fall of 1941, Anderson made renowned first baseman Johnny Evers, Governor Robert A. Hurley and United States Representative James A. Shanley of New Haven honorary vice presidents of the Veteran Baseball Players Association. Two years prior, Anderson had lobbied Congressman Shanley to submit a resolution to the United States House of Representatives outlining the concept of National Baseball Day. With the full backing of Anderson and the veterans association, Congressman Shanley took up the crusade once again in 1941, but no legislation was passed. Anderson intended National Baseball Day to be an observance honoring the game and its supposed Civil War era forefather, Major General Abner Doubleday.

Congressman James A. Shanley, with his son James A. Shanley Jr., 1939 (c.)

Because Doubleday’s parents once lived in Lebanon, Connecticut, before relocating to Ballston Spa, New York, Anderson surmised a direct link between Doubleday and Connecticut. Therefore, Anderson thought it fitting for a congressmen from Connecticut to introduce a resolution for National Baseball Day. He chose Doubleday’s birthday, June 26, as the date of observance. Anderson conspired with politicians to get National Baseball Day enacted into law and spent his final fifteen years advocating for the cause.

Major General Abner Doubleday, 1865 (c.)

Following the attack on Pearl Harbor on December 22, 1941, Hartford’s young men prepared for military service. Meanwhile, Anderson provided Hartford residents with a diversion at the lanes. As president of the Greater Hartford Big Pin Bowling League in 1942, he was tasked with organizing one of the most competitive bowling leagues in Connecticut. Colt Patent Fire-Arms Manufacturing and United Aircraft Corporation entered teams into the big pin league. That year, Anderson also volunteered as a committee member of the 61st Republican precinct.

Hartford Exiles, 1942.

Anderson soon made significant headway towards implementing National Baseball Day. On March 20, 1943, a letter and a copy of Anderson’s resolution and was received by the White House. Congressman William J. Miller of the Hartford Exiles had sent the letter to President Franklin D. Roosevelt on behalf of Anderson and the Veteran Baseball Players Association. Miller highlighted the potential war chest benefits of establishing National Baseball Day:

William J. Miller, U.S. Representative from Connecticut, 1943.

“It might be possible to tie this observance in with the sale of war bonds and stamps. I believe it would be possible to secure the cooperation of the Commissioner of baseball, officials of the major and minor leagues, along with a couple of thousand of men who are interested in sandlot baseball throughout the country. If the Treasury Department, through the offices of those engage in promoting the sale of war bonds and stamps, would cooperate in the effort, I believe that the baseball fans of the United States would purchase substantially over $1 billion worth of bonds and stamps on that one day.”

William J. Miller, U.S. Representative
Letter to President Roosevelt about National Baseball Day from Congressman Miller, 1943.

No written response came from President Roosevelt, who was busy commanding American forces in World War II. When Congressman Miller presented National Baseball Day to Congress, the bill died on the House floor. However, Harry Anderson persevered. After marking the 30th anniversary of the Bermuda Invaders, Anderson and Hartford’s Chapter No. 1 of the Veteran Baseball Players Association planned a trip to Lebanon, Connecticut. They sought to promote National Baseball Day at home of Doubleday’s parents but strict wartime limits on gasoline during the war forced Anderson to cancel the pilgrimage.

Harry N. Anderson, 1943.

A few months after the invasion of D-Day, Harry Anderson made an appearance at a Camp Courant award ceremony with Private Tony DeMaio of the Marine Corps. They were also joined by members of the Hartford baseball club: Business Manager Charlie Blossfield, Manager Del Bissonette, and a pitcher, Merle Settlemire. They presented the Bert Keane Trophy for sportsmanship to Angelo Perone of 54 Charter Oak Avenue. Then, in October of 1944, Anderson was in an automobile accident. He sustained minor injuries and checked into Hartford Hospital. Anderson made a full recovery and details of his injuries were not disclosed.

Harry N. Anderson visits Camp Courant, 1944.

In his latter years, Anderson was a frequent contributor to the opinion pages of the Hartford Courant. When Judge Kenesaw Mountain Landis died on November 25, 1944, Anderson composed a tribute to baseball’s “greatest leader” who restored confidence in the game. He shared a personal anecdote of meeting Landis who jumped at the opportunity to attend Hartford Boys’ Baseball Day in 1927. Anderson’s next editorial called for the continuation of athletics during World War II. He touted the physical, mental and social benefits of sports. Baseball in particular, he argued, was an important facet of daily life and served as an inspiration to young people.

Kenesaw Mountain Landis playing golf with Hartford Mayor Walter Batterson, 1930.

Anderson was behind another public address when the Hartford Exiles broadcasted their 1945 reunion on the radio. Remarks were made by Congressman Miller who endorsed the Universal Service Act—requiring military service for American citizens. At the dinner, Commandant Anderson wore his YMCA uniform from his days in France. Later that year, Anderson was appointed to Hartford’s Medallion Commission, an official committee that voted on military service awards given on behalf of the city. War heroes such as Major General Leonard F. Wing and General Jonathan M. Wainwright were presented medals while making appearances in Hartford.

Hartford Exiles, 1945.

Then in August, Anderson showed his appreciation for a late friend, Mary E. J. Lally. She had been general supervisor of Camp Courant since 1924. After her sudden passing in 1934, Lally was remembered each year at the camp on “Mary E. J. Lally Day” and Anderson was a regular attendee. Like his friend Mary Lally, Anderson was a champion of youth organizations and physical education. His attachment to these causes led him publish more editorials on the topics of athletics, politics and all things Hartford.

Anderson attends Mary E. J. Lally Day at Camp Courant, Hartford, 1945.

In two columns during 1945, Anderson expressed the need for an indoor arena in Hartford capable of hosting various cold weather sports. The Greater Hartford community had become more interested in cold weather sports such as basketball and hockey. He recommended dedicating the arena to veterans of both world wars and suggested a design similar to the Hershey Sports Arena in Pennsylvania. However, it would be another thirty years until the Hartford Civic Center was built in 1974.

Hershey Sports Arena, Hershey, Pennsylvania, 1940 (c.)

On New Years night in 1946, Harry Anderson and his exclusive club of Exiles dined around an “H” shaped table at Hotel Garde. Commandant Anderson presided as master of ceremonies which included the induction of Major Kenneth G. Collins into the order. Colonel Elmer S. Watson, state motor vehicles commissioner gave the keynote speech about the cost of world peace. He praised the valorous acts carried out by 43rd Infantry Division, made up of men from Connecticut, Maine, Rhode Island, and Vermont. Former Staff Sargent Donald C. Millen of Rocky Hill, Connecticut, exhibited his collection of souvenirs from a raid of the Reich Chancellery in Berlin.

Hartford Exiles, 1946.

The Bermuda Invaders reunion of 1946 took place at Marble Pillar, a German restaurant in downtown Hartford. At the dinner, Anderson screened a short film of the 1945 World Series featuring the American League Champion Detroit Tigers defeating the National League Champion Chicago Cubs in seven games. Anderson had become a regular customer at Marble Pillar and a friend of the restaurant owner, Carl Struve. When Struve turned 72 years old, Anderson and the Veteran Baseball Players Association threw a him a birthday party.

Carl Struve, owner of Marble Pillar, 1946.
Marble Pillar advertisement, 1965.

In spring of 1946, Anderson donated unboxed baseball gloves to a contest run by the Hartford Chiefs and a group known as the Lady Fans of Hartford. The women’s fan club selected two Hartford High School baseball players, Bob Andrews and Arnold Lewis as recipients of the gloves and a Spring Training tryout with the Hartford Chiefs in Greenwood, Mississippi. Towards the end of the baseball season, Anderson made his annual visit to Camp Courant accompanied by Charlie Blossfield of the Hartford Chiefs and William J. Lee of the Hartford Courant. The trio the camp’s highest honor to Kenneth Jerome for sportsmanship, citizenship and athletic ability. 

Lady Fans of Hartford gift baseball gloves donated by Harry N. Anderson to Hartford students, 1946.
Harry Anderson looks on (right) as Kenneth Jerome receives Bert Keane Trophy at Camp Courant, 1946.

The following year, Anderson revisited the push for National Baseball Day. He wrote another editorial in the newspaper on April 20, 1947, endorsing the creation of National Baseball Day and exclaiming the importance of Abner Doubleday:

“For if he had not conceived the idea of the game, there would be no baseball game and no Babe Ruth to take part. Congressman William J. Miller of Connecticut had presented a resolution to side aside [Major] General Abner Doubleday’s birthday as a National Baseball Day and will bring it before the President and Congress again. A certain percentage of the receipts from the games in the major and minor baseball leagues on the National Baseball Day could be devoted to taking care of veteran baseball players in need and the youth program in the development of baseball among sandlot players as a National Baseball Fund.”

Harry N. Anderson
Harry N. Anderson, 1947.

Anderson’s calls for National Baseball Day were heard, but the levers of government had failed to deliver results. Yet, he remained engaged in the Veteran Baseball Player’s Association. Anderson was chosen as president at the annual convention of 1948 at Craig Loch Manor in Meriden, Connecticut. His bygone friends, Luke Crowe of West Haven and Mickey Lambert of Unionville, served as officers. Former professional players, Harry Noyes of West Haven and James. J. Burns of Hartford, were each named vice presidents.

Craig Loch Manor, Meriden, Connecticut, 1948 (c.)

On August 17, 1948, Anderson attended the funeral of baseball’s biggest superstar, Babe Ruth. He was selected by Mayor Cyril Coleman to represent the City of Hartford. Ruth’s memorial was held at Universal Funeral Chapel on 52nd Street in Manhattan. About a month later, Anderson accepted an appointment to Hartford’s Rent Advisory Board. He had been personally recommended to the position by Governor James C. Shannon.

Hartford Exiles at 29th annual reunion, 1948.
Harry N. Anderson named as Hartford’s delegate for Babe Ruth’s funeral, 1948.
Governor James C. Shannon, 1948.

The Hartford Exiles gathered for their thirtieth anniversary on January 3, 1949. The milestone was held at the University Club situated at 30 Lewis Street. Twenty-five members heard Superior Court Judge Edward J. Daly deliver the keynote speech. Daly, one of three American judges at the Nuremberg Trials, spoke about the ruthless and criminal conduct of the Nazi regime. The Hartford Exiles inducted two new members, who were announced as the final additions to the order. Even though new membership had ended, Anderson promised that the reunions would go on.

Hartford Exiles at the University Club, 1949.
Judge Edward J. Daly, 1949.

In the spring of 1949, Anderson gave a commencement speech to the graduating class at his alma mater, Brown School. By summertime, he made an obligatory visit and donation to Camp Courant on behalf of the Charity Bowling Carnival. Then, ten years after being honored by the National Baseball Hall of Fame, Anderson and the Bermuda Invaders were invited back to Cooperstown. Director of the Hall Fame, Bob Quinn recognized their feat in Bermuda, and he signed a draft of Anderson’s National Baseball Day resolution.

Harry N. Anderson (center) at Camp Courant, 1949.
Harry N. Anderson (left) at graduation of the Brown School on Market Street in Hartford, 1949.

In 1950, Anderson coaxed Congressman Abraham Ribicoff into backing National Baseball Day. Ribicoff, a Democrat, crafted legislation for the observance, but again, the bill was rejected in committee. Back in Hartford, Anderson wrote short column endorsing fellow Exile, William A. Purtell for Governor of Connecticut. Purtell lost the 1950 Republican primary to Congressman John Davis Lodge. Later that year, the Exiles mourned the passing of three members: Rev. Raymond Cunningham, Congressman William J. Miller and former managing editor of the Hartford Courant, George B. Armstead.

Hartford Exiles, 1950.
Congressman Abraham Ribicoff introduces legislation for National Baseball Day, 1950.

Anderson and Hartford Exiles began 1951 at the University Club for their thirty-second annual reunion. Hartford Attorney Thomas J. Dodd, distinguished for his work as prosector at the Nuremberg Trials, was guest speaker. Anderson and others listened to the aspiring politician declare communist Russia as America’s next greatest threat. Dinner guests enjoyed the same four course meal served in Paris in 1919. The Exiles ended the night by singing the national anthems of the United States and of France.

An architectural drawing of the University Club, Hartford, Connecticut, 1936.
Thomas J. Dodd, 1946.

The Charity Bowling Carnival in February of 1951 was wildly popular. Anderson’s annual event for Camp Courant attracted seventy-two bowling teams who competed until a half hour until midnight. At 65 years old, Anderson’s philanthropic ways never ceased. On August 24, 1951, he arranged a special night at Bulkeley Stadium for young patients of the Newington Crippled Home for Children, who were greeted by members of the Hartford Chiefs and given autographed baseballs. At the end of the year, Anderson received a national honor when he was handpicked by the Amateur Athletic Union to vote on finalists for the James E. Sullivan Award.

Harry N. Anderson (seated, center) visits Camp Courant, 1951.
The Hartford Chiefs meet a patient from Newington Home for Crippled Children at Bulkeley Stadium, 1951.

In 1952, Anderson and the Bermuda Invaders celebrated the fortieth anniversary since their groundbreaking trip. Some members of the close-knit team brought their wives to the banquet including Theodore J. Marenholtz, Harry E. Rau and Carl Palmberg. Anderson never married. Instead, he reveled in camaraderie within fraternal, athletic and nonprofit organizations, many of which he had founded. He had few family relations, but he had dozens of close friends and admiring acquaintances.

Bermuda Invaders celebrate 40th Anniversary in Hartford, 1952.
The Bert Keane Trophy awarded by management of the Hartford Chiefs and Harry N. Anderson (right) at Camp Courant, 1952.

As a self-proclaimed “friend of pets,” Anderson owned a cocker spaniel named Princess. On a few occasions, Anderson contributed articles to the newspaper concerning the treatment dogs in Hartford. He advocated for a new shelter where stray or abandoned pets could remain until adopted by residents. Each Christmas Eve, from 1950 to 1953, Anderson went door-to-door gifting bones to local dogs. One reporter called him the “Santa Claus of Canines.”

Harry N. Anderson gives bones to dogs on Christmas Eve, 1952

Anderson carried on his humanitarian habits in 1953. The Charity Bowling Carnival raised $75 for the Newington Home and Hospital for Crippled Children. During the check presentation, Anderson gifted a baseball autographed by Milwaukee Braves to Thomas Julian of West Hartford, a patient at the Newington facility. In another baseball matter, Anderson penned a glowing tribute to Hall of Fame Bob Quinn upon his passing in 1954: “He brought to the game the spirit of clean and honorable sportsmanship in all his dealings.”

Harry N. Anderson (second from right) hands autographed ball to Thomas Julian at the Newington Home and Hospital for Crippled Children, 1953.

Towards the end of his life, Harry Anderson lived at 21 Montrose Street, Hartford. After an extended illness, he passed away on Christmas Day, 1954, at New Britain Hospital at the age of 69. Anderson died leaving many lifelong friends behind. They were saddened to lose him before his seventies. He was remembered as head of the Charity Bowling Carnival, Commandant of the Hartford Exiles and leader of the Bermuda Invaders. Anderson served others and in the process, he rubbed elbows with America’s greatest sports figures and politicians.

Harry N. Anderson at Camp Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, 1954.

A few days after Anderson’s passing, a friend from South Norwalk, Connecticut, and former track athlete, Harold Cutbill wrote a touching “A Tribute to Harry N. Anderson” in the Hartford Courant. In his last will and testament, Anderson left savings to Hartford causes and organizations. He bequeathed $16,000 in all. Camp Courant and Times Farm received $500 each. Other beneficiaries were Christ Church Cathedral, YMCA of Hartford, Newington Home for Crippled Children, Masonic Charity Foundation of Wallingford and the Hartford Chapter of the Yankee Division. Surviving members of the Hartford Exiles were left $500 to defray costs at future reunions.

Hartford Courant excerpt, December 29, 1954.

Anderson’s pursuit of National Baseball Day did not go in vain. He had convinced Congressman Thomas J. Dodd to take up the resolution, but it failed to pass the committee stage yet again. However, President Dwight D. Eisenhower, an ardent baseball fan, saw merit in the observance day. In 1957, President Eisenhower declared the first National Baseball Polio Day on Flag Day, June 14, 1957, at stadiums and sandlots across America. Professional and amateur teams throughout the United States collected donations to combat the polio epidemic.

National Baseball Polo Day is established, 1957.

With great vigor and influence, Harry N. Anderson was a sports promoter, a philanthropist and a founding father of amateur baseball in Hartford. He acted admirably as a conduit between the city and charitable organizations. Thousands of men, women and children benefited from his life’s work. He was a man of strong traditions, varied interests, charity, service and faith who devised athletic leagues and blazed baseball’s trail, from Hartford to Bermuda to Cooperstown.

The Harry Anderson Memorial Bowling Carnival at Capitol Alleys, Hartford, Connecticut, 1955.

Gentlemen:—

Permit me to comment on the part you have taken in the interest of the poor children of this city that they might enjoy the recreational privileges that others of better circumstances have benefited for their physical welfare. It is a most worthy object that should have the support of all whose means will allow. I feel that the sporting fraternity of this city is in sympathy with any movement that will aid in the betterment of the physical development of our community life and should have a part this cause.

I therefore have arranged for a benefit baseball game to be played at a later date for which the proceeds will be turned over to this work. It is through the spirited co-operation of the Hartford police and firemen together with the services of the Hartford Grays and Simsbury teams of the County League that this is made possible.

I feel sure the sporting fraternity of this city will lend its patronage as it has all times in the past so that the event may be a big success in the upkeep of this worthy work. Assuring you my co-operation and best wishes for its continued success. I remain—

Sincerely yours,

Harry N. Anderson
July 31, 1920

¹A similar National Baseball Day resolution was presented to Congress in 1996 by Senator Frank Lautenberg of New Jersey however this time, Alexander Joy Cartwright Jr. was named as the founding father of baseball, not Abner Doubleday.

Sources

1. Hartford Courant database accessed through Newspapers.com
2. Player profiles on Baseball-Reference.com
3. Media content from Connecticuthistoryillustrated.org
4. Boston Globe database accessed through Newspapers.com
5. SABR Bio Project, Les Mann: sabr.org/bioproj/person/les-mann/
6. Baseball Prospectus: baseballprospectus.com/
7. Martin, Brian. Baseball’s Creation Myth: Adam Ford, Abner Graves and the Cooperstown Story. McFarland, Incorporated, Publishers, 2013.

2021 All-Star Team Selections

The GHTBL is proud to present the 2021 All-star roster and alternates. GHTBL All-Stars will compete against both the Connecticut All-Stars (Friday, 8/20, 7 PM at Palmer Field, Middletown, Connecticut) and the George Donnelly Sunset League All-Stars (Sunday, 8/22, 4 PM at Dodd Stadium, Norwich, Connecticut).

Playoff Batting Leaders

PlayerTeamPositionGABRH2B3BHRRBISFSACBBHBPSOSBAVGOBPSLGOPS
Corey PlaskyEast Hartford Jets2B51831020020020230.5560.6000.6671.267
Travis SaloisRainbow GraphicsOF, P5183810160000200.4440.4440.6671.111
Gunnar JohnsonGunnar JohnsonM&T BankDH6227710240001800.3180.3480.6360.984
CipkasStanley CipkasRainbow GraphicsOF4124600140002240.5000.5710.7501.321
Jack HalpinVernon Orioles1B, P4172620010000000.3530.3530.4710.824
IMG 5237Matt CostanzaRainbow GraphicsSS5165620000022110.3750.5000.5001.000
Aedin Wadja South Windsor Phillies Baseball GHTBLAedin WadjaSouth Windsor Phillies2B3114610021011000.5450.5710.6361.208
Justin MillerM&T BankOF6172610030010100.3530.3890.4120.801
Tyler RepoliRainbow Graphics1B, P5172621070020100.3530.4210.5881.009
Shaun CallahanShaun CallahanM&T BankOF6163610180030600.3750.4740.6251.099

Playoff Pitching Leaders

PlayerTeamPositionGGSWLCGSHOSVIPHRERHRHBPBBSOERAWHIP
Camden Murphy MT Bank Baseball GHTBLCamden MurphyM&T BankP222020014156511272.501.29
Jim SchultEast Hartford JetsOF, P522020014722014241.000.86
Darrion Williams East Hartford Jets GHTBL 2Darrion WilliamsEast Hartford JetsOF, P221121014954203162.000.86
Charlie Hesseltine Record Journal Expos Baseball GHTBLCharlie Hesseltine-P11011001195301341.911.18
IMGP0022GriffinJohn Griffin-P221000010944040102.801.30
Eric Malinoswki MT Bank Baseball GHTBLEric MalinowskiM&T BankP22200001072202391.401.20
Matt Smith M&T Bank Baseball GHTBLMatt SmithM&T BankP21010009633005142.331.22
Luke Mathewson South Windsor Phillies Baseball GHTBLLuke MathewsonSouth Windsor PhilliesP, UTIL1100000773300393.001.43
jd baseballJD TylerRecord-Journal ExposOF, P1101100764110121.001.00
Shane Bogli Vernon Orioles Baseball GHTBLShane BogliVernon OriolesOF, P1101100795502045.001.57
Jason Ray South Windsor Phillies GHTBL 1Jason RayVernon OriolesP11101007322110132.000.57
Trevor MoultonSouth Windsor PhilliesP1110100773300423.001.57
Ryan SkaffRainbow GraphicsP11000006.297700327.901.94
Taylor KosakowskiEast Hartford Jets1B, OF, P10100006.210000060.000.16
Casey Johnson South Windsor Phillies Baseball GHTBLCasey JohnsonSouth Windsor PhilliesP1100000676611317.001.83
Trevor NohillyBristol GreenersOF, P1101100683300023.501.33
Brendan O’Connell-OF, P11100005.155301004.121.18
Zachary ZajacZachary ZajacM&T BankP40000015.174410245.491.76
IMG 5204Evan Chamberlain-P, UTIL3101000572200172.801.60
Ian HalpinVernon OriolesINF, P4010000550000210.001.40

All-Star Match Ups

DateGameTime/ResultsArticle

Vernon Orioles Clinch Regular Season Title

Congratulations to Manager Jack Ceppetelli and every member of the Vernon Orioles on their pennant-winning 2021 Regular Season. Featuring three sets of brother, the Orioles used timely hitting and superior pitching performances to pull off relative domination of the twilight league.

Tyler Pogmore, Tony Trubia and Jordan English ranked among league leaders in batting. Matt Curtis and Bill Riggieri pitched most effectively for Vernon throughout the season.

June and July were highly successful months for the Orioles, but they will seek the ultimate prize in August as the top seed in the 2021 Playoff Tournament. The postseason will be held at Palmer Field in Middletown and at McKenna Field in East Hartford.

The Orioles (14-3) have won their eighth Regular Season title in the last nine years while overall, they have won a combined 16 season titles and playoff championships.

August 20 – GHTBL All-Stars vs. CTL All-Stars

Greater Hartford Twilight Baseball League and Connecticut Twilight League will play a postseason interleague All-Star game at 7 PM on Friday, August 20, 2021.

This year, GHTBL will host the exhibition at Palmer Field on Bernie O’Rourke Drive in Middletown, Connecticut. The 9-inning game will mark the sixth contest between GHTBL and CTL in which GHTBL has remained undefeated.

Aside from several rainouts, both league’s regular seasons are going as planned. After a champions are crowned, managers will decide on all-star selections. These all-star matchups allow each league to showcase many of our best players. Participants, parents and fans are welcomed to attend the exhibition at no charge.

As always, we thank you for your continued support.

We will see you at the ballpark! Free admission!

GHTBL East Hartford Jets 2020 Playoff Champions

August 7 to 16 – 2021 Playoff Tournament

On August 7, 2021, the Greater Hartford Twilight Baseball League will begin our postseason at Palmer Field in Middletown, Connecticut. Consolation bracket games will start August 8, 2021 at McKenna Field in East Hartford, Connecticut. Our annual double-elimination playoff tournament will conclude at McKenna Field as shown below:



Admission: $10 per person for a ticket to the entire tournament. Free for kids 14 and under.

Stay tuned for weather-related postponements and announcements at www.GHTBL.org.

Tight Race in the Twi-Loop

Last night Jack Blake homered for the East Hartford Jets beating People’s United Bank 7-2. Cole Lalli earned his third win and the Jets moved to 5 and 1 on the year.

Having completed one third of the 2021 GHTBL Regular Season, the frontrunning East Hartford Jets and Vernon Orioles lead the standings.

The season title is very much up for grabs now that the Orioles have hit a 2-game skid. Meanwhile, Rainbow Graphics and South Windsor Phillies are lurking in a tie for third place.

Other honorable mention teams are Ulbrich Steel and Malloves Jewelers. So far shortstop, Sam DeMaio of Steel leads the league in hits and triples. Mike Munson has three homers for the Jewelers.

For all league wide statistics, go to GHTBL.org/stats.

Back! Jets Take Aim at Orioles in Championship Rematch

On June 2, 2021, the East Hartford Jets, Twi-loop playoff champions of 2020 will battle the Vernon Orioles at McKenna Field, East Hartford at 7 PM.

The Jets will feature many of the same players from last season such as shortstop Jeff Criscuolo, pitcher/outfielder Jimmy Schult and player-manager Taylor Kosakowski. Some new faces will include Cole Lalli and Jack Blake who hail from Eastern Connecticut State University.

The Orioles have a trusted core of veteran players who are expected to return in 2021. Manager Jack Ceppetelli has also recruited a handful of new players. Without disclosing specific names, Vernon’s roster will likely be one of the best in Connecticut’s amateur ranks.

Each GHTBL franchise will play 18 Regular Season games this year. A 10-team double-elimination tournament (maximum of 19 league-wide playoff games) is scheduled to begin on August 3, 2021.

Ten Twi-loop franchises will compete this summer: Bristol Greeners, East Hartford Jets, Hartford Colts, Malloves Jewelers (Middletown), People’s United Bank (Wethersfield), Rainbow Graphics (Manchester), Record-Journal Expos (Meriden), South Windsor Phillies, Ulbrich Steel (Cheshire) and the Vernon Orioles.

The GHTBL allows players to apply for a roster spot until July 15th by filling out a Player Application at www.GHTBL.org/Join.

Johnny Taylor Field Charity Series at Dunkin’

To raise funds for Johnny Taylor Field, the Greater Hartford Twilight Baseball League will play a doubleheader on Monday, August 3, 2020 at Dunkin’ Donuts Park.

If you’ve been itching to watch some baseball at Dunkin’ Donuts Park, you’re in luck. And if you’re interested in Hartford’s baseball heritage, it’s must-see baseball.

The venerable Greater Hartford Twilight Baseball League will stage a doubleheader Monday beginning at 6 p.m., fans allowed, to raise money for what’s yet needed to complete Johnny Taylor Field at Colt Park. A host of future major league players have appeared in the GHTBL though its history, which began in 1929, but Taylor, though he was kept out of the segregated major leagues in his time, is considered by many to be the greatest of them all.

Johnny Taylor Field under construction, Colt Park, Hartford, Connecticut, 2020.

Negro Leagues star Johnny ‘Schoolboy’ Taylor may be Hartford’s greatest baseball player; with enough signatures, a city ballfield may be named for him »

“He’s probably the most talented pitcher to ever come from Hartford,” said Wes Ulbrich, GM of the Ulbrich Steel team and the league’s historian. “The Yankees were going to sign him, and he would have been the first Black player signed in the history of the game, but they decided not to when they found out he was African-American. He would have been the first in the 1930s.”

Taylor played for Bulkeley High as a senior in 1933, and struck out 25 batters in a nine-inning game against New Britain. A Yankees scout, Gene McCann, was sent to Hartford to watch Taylor pitch, and called The Courant to find out when he’d be on the mound again. Sports Editor Albert W. Keane told McCann that Taylor was African-American, and McCann’s response, “cannot be printed in a family newspaper,” Keane wrote. The Philadelphia A’s were also reported as interested at the time, but unwilling to sign Taylor.

Taylor, who had the nickname “Schoolboy,” went on to a long professional career in the Negro Leagues. In 1936, columnist Lewis R. Dial in the New York Age, chastised Yankees top executive Ed Barrow for not signing Taylor, who was by then starring for the New York Cubans. “Surely, Mr. Barrow has heard of him, for his talent scout went all the way to Hartford to look over this youngster,” Dial wrote.

One can only imagine how many games the fire-balling Taylor might have won for the Yankees of the 1930s, with Lou Gehrig, Joe DiMaggio, Tony Lazzeri and Bill Dickey producing runs for him.

There were suggestions that Taylor renounce his heritage, learn Spanish and pose as Cuban, but he would not do that. He often returned to Hartford to play before packed crowds, at Colt Park or Bulkeley Stadium. In September 1941, Taylor brought an all-star team from the Negro Leagues to play the famous Savitt Gems; his catcher was Hall-of-Famer Josh Gibson. Taylor struck out 15.

Johnny Taylor (left) and Satchel Paige, 1942.

“There was one time [Taylor] needed a police escort, because there were so many people,” Ulbrich said.

Taylor’s story is particularly relevant this summer as the Negro Leagues’ 100th anniversary is commemorated. He finished his pro career playing for the Eastern League’s Hartford Chiefs in 1949, and he lived in the city until his death in 1987.

Through the Colt Park Foundation, Ulbrich hopes to raise more money to supplement funds already allotted for improvements. Johnny Taylor Field at Colt Park is supposed to be ready for the spring of 2021.

“We’re going to donate to Public Works, so they can get things like bases and signage,” said Ulbrich, “or they might choose for us to buy it and donate it. We really need lights, which is a lot of money, but they just gave an additional $500,000 for Colt Park. We want to keep fundraising through the Colt Park Foundation. We really care about the park, and it ties in with our league’s history so much.”

Watch more on the push to rename Johnny Taylor Field in Colt Park:

NBC Connecticut covers Johnny Taylor Field renaming.

The Greater Hartford Twilight League is playing its 92nd season despite the pandemic, with health and safety protocols and social distancing rules proving effective so far. The league schedule, usually 24 games, is 12. “We’ve had no issues,” Ulbrich said.

For the games Monday at Dunkin’ Donuts Park, the league got a reduction in rent from the Yard Goats and secured free parking in the Trumbull Street Stadium lot, which holds about 250 cars. With Dunkin’ Donuts Park’s 6,000 capacity, and a 25 percent capacity limit, that should be enough for Monday’s doubleheader. Tickets are $10 for adults; children under 14 get in free. The Record-Journal Expos play People’s United Bank at 6 p.m., and Ulbrich Steel plays the East Hartford Jets at 8 p.m.

Dom Amore can be reached at damore@courant.com.

Watch more on the renaming of Johnny Taylor Field in Colt Park:

Bill Shea Photographs GHTBL Ball Games

Professional photos from a fan of the league.

Since last season, a local photographer named Bill Shea has been snapping shots of Twilight League action. Fans of the league are welcomed to send in photos to: CONTACT@GHTBL.ORG or tag us on Instagram: @GHTBL. We will feature you and your talents! Thank you to Bill and all of the fans who have come to our games this season. We are reporting a record number of fans this year!

VIEW BILL SHEA’S PHOTOGRAPHY AT: https://www.billsheaphotographer.com/GHTBL-Baseball

Twi-Loop is Off and Running

GHTBL completes first week without a hitch.

Amidst a global pandemic, the GHTBL is playing baseball in 2020. Our 12-game Regular Season schedule is underway and the first week has been completed. Managers, players and fans are excited to be back. Without any unforeseen hiccups or health scares, local amateur baseball looks like it is here to stay.

Most recently, GHTBL was featured by John Pierson of News Channel 8 Sports. He highlighted the league’s history and its prospects for the future. Gabby Lucivero of NBC Connecticut also interviewed Justin Morhardt of People’s United Bank and his family, who have a long baseball tradition in the Twilight League and professional baseball. 

Four notable minor league players have joined the league this season. Willy Yahn for People’s United Bank as well as Matt Cleveland, Jimmy Titus and Jack Patterson for the Vernon Orioles. A mix of young players and veterans will create great matchups all year long. 

Current college athletes in the GHTBL will be earning valuable experience this summer. Hard-throwing pitchers and fast paced games are the repetitions that players need to improve. The Twilight League is flooded with arms who throw over 88 MPH and pitcher’s duels are not uncommon. However, some teams like the Record-Journal Expos and the East Hartford Jets have managed to put up big run totals thus far.

The league, led by President Bill Holowaty, is proud to be playing the game we all love. Come on out and support baseball in Greater Hartford by attending a game. Regular Season admission is free. Our annual double-elimination playoff tournament is scheduled for early-to-mid August and will take place at McKenna Field in East Hartford and Ceppa Field in Meriden, Connecticut.

Stay tuned for more updates!

Play Ball! 2020 Schedule Posted

The GHTBL Regular Season schedule has been published.

After a recent league meeting, GHTBL Executive Committee members have determined the 2020 Regular Season schedule.  Some dates are subject to change. 7 franchises will compete in the 92nd season of the Twilight League. Each team will play 12 games followed by our standard double-elimination playoff tournament.

Players will need to appear in 2 games to qualify for playoffs. Fans will be welcomed at all games as long as they social distance and adhere to state guidelines..

GHTBL officials, managers and players are pleased to be playing baseball again. In partnership with the Hartford Board of Umpires, the league will work diligently to protect players, coaches, umpires and fans.

Opening Day is July 7, 2020

GHTBL announces start of 2020 season.

LEAGUE ANNOUNCEMENT

Monday, July 7, 2020 will be Opening Day this year. The Twilight League will begin its 92nd season of play.

12 games followed by a double-elimination playoff tournament (more details and full schedule to be announced).

Players should plan to use their own personal equipment like gloves and helmets.

The league will be announcing other safety measures and precautions in the near future but they will not limit the game on the field.

We’re looking forward to playing ball!

Stayed tuned for additional updates. 

GHTBL Joins ABCA

All GHTBL Managers become ABCA members to improve coaching and player development.

The GHTBL is pleased to announce a strategic partnership with the American Baseball Coaches Association (ABCA).  Our league and all of our managers will become members of the ABCA, the world’s largest amateur baseball coaching organization. 

The ABCA provides coaching resources, clinics, events, news and information about all things amateur baseball.  There are nearly 13,000 members representing all 50 states and 25 countries worldwide.

GHTBL President, Bill Holowaty is an ABCA Board Member, a former ABCA President and a 2002 ABCA Hall of Fame inductee.  Coach Holowaty is looking forward to improving the baseball knowledge and teaching tools of each GHTBL manager. 

Coach says, “You only get better if you keep learning.”  Barry Chasen, former Windsor High School head coach, GHTBL Hall of Fame inductee and current Greater Hartford umpire was inducted in the ABCA Hall of Fame in 2017.

The GHTBL is excited to join the ABCA in 2020 and our managers look forward to helping amateur ballplayers reach their fullest potential.  A special thanks goes to ABCA Executive Director Craig Keilitz for his tireless efforts in operating a world class baseball organization.

Winter Workouts for Twi-Leaguers & Prospects

860Baseball of Hartford hosts GHTBL and new recruits.

A new Twilight League development has materialized this off-season.  The first “Winter Workout” was held on Wednesday, December 18, 2019 at 860Baseball in Hartford, Connecticut. 

GHTBL veterans and prospective players met up to stretch out, throw bullpen, take indoor batting practice and to socialize.  In all, 18 ballplayers attended the inaugural Winter Workout, many of which said they would be back for the next training session.  

Winter Workout #2 will take place on Thursday, January 16, 2020 at 860Baseball.  In fact, the GHTBL plans to organize monthly workouts this off-season.  Each training session will be announced 3 weeks in advance. Two sessions will be planned for April. 

Many thanks goes to the friendly staff and ownership at 860Baseball for their hospitality.

CLICK HERE TO SEE A CLIP FROM WINTER WORKOUT #1. 

GHTBL Executive Committee Holds Winter Meeting

President Holowaty leads plans for 2020 season.

On Sunday, December 8, 2019, the Executive Committee and managers of each GHTBL franchise convened at OC Kitchen in Rocky Hill, Connecticut for our annual winter meeting.  In preparation for the upcoming season,

GHTBL leadership discussed, decided and voted on several league matters.  These included where and when to play another league-wide Charity Series, revisions to GHTBL By-laws and mobilizing for the 3rd Annual Buzzy Levin Golf Tournament.

The golf tournament is planned for Sunday, May 17, 2020 at Blackledge Country Club in Hebron, Connecticut. All GHTBL Alumni will be invited to attend.  The Executive Committee predicts that 120 golfers will attend and that major support from local businesses will come in the form of tee signs sponsorships.

GHTBL leadership debated and eventually agreed on the start of the 2020 season. Opening Day of the Regular Season is expected to take place in the last week of May between reigning champions, the Vernon Orioles and Playoff Tournament runner-ups, People’s United Bank. 

All 8 GHTBL franchises plan to actively recruit new players as the season nears, especially in the age range of 18 to 22 years old. 

2019 Annual Awards – Complete List

People’s United Bank Rakes in the Accolades

Here are the 2019 GHTBL Award Winners:

Frank McCoy Award – Most Valuable Player – Jason Sullivan, 3B, Record-Journal Expos

Ray McKenna Award – Player of the Year – Ian Halpin, INF, Vernon Orioles

Mike Liappes Award – Most Valuable Pitcher – Charlie Hesseltine, P, Record-Journal Expos

Rev. Thomas Campion Award – Outstanding Playoff Hitter – Daren Grabowski, OF, People’s United Bank

Mike Abbruzzese Award – Outstanding Playoff Pitcher – Jimmy Schult, P/OF, East Hartford Jets

Hal Lewis Award – Most Versatile Player – A.J. Hendrickson, P/C, Record-Journal Expos

Jack Repass Award – Gold Glove – Jack Risley, SS, People’s United Bank

James Gallagher Award – Rookie of the Year – Pete Barrows, Ulbrich Steel and Mac Finnegan, OF, People’s United Bank

Gene Johnson Award – Regular Season Batting Title – Daren Grabowski, OF, People’s United Bank

Ralph Giansanti Sr. Award – Stolen Base Leader – Hector Gonzalez, SS, Record-Journal Expos

Mark and Jane Foss Award – RBI Leader – Mac Finnegan, OF, People’s United Bank

Jack Rose Trophy – Playoff Champion – Vernon Orioles, Jack Ceppetelli, Manager

Jake Banks Trophy – Regular Season Champion – Record-Journal Expos, Charlie Hesseltine, Manager

A Farewell to Wethersfield Ballplayer, Joe Hallisey

Inducted into the GHTBL Hall of Fame in 1986.

Joseph McMahon Hallisey passed away on September 13, 2019. Born November 20, 1925, at his home on Hillcrest Avenue in Wethersfield, Joe was the son of the late Joseph A. and Katherine (McMahon) Hallisey; he resided in Wethersfield his entire life.

A retired structural engineer, Joe owned and operated Hallisey Engineering Associates, Inc. in Wethersfield and Hartford for more than sixty years. Hallisey was married to his wife Maureen for 63 years.

Joe Halisey was a gifted third baseman and batter who played for the following GHTBL teams: Wethersfield Shadows, Yellow Cab and Wethersfield A.C.

He graduated from Wethersfield High School in 1943. Joe proudly served in the U.S. Army Air Corps during World War II and was honorably discharged in 1946. He earned a Bachelor of Architectural Engineering degree from The Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C., graduating in 1951.

A certified private pilot, Joe earned his instrument rating and was the proud owner of a Piper PA-22 Tri-Pacer N7838D. Joe was inducted into the Greater Hartford Twilight Baseball League Hall of Fame in 1986 and the Wethersfield Alumni Athletic Hall of Fame in 2012.

All-Star Game at Muzzy Field

GHTBL All-Stars vs. CTL All-Stars at 7 PM.

On Sunday, August 19, 2019 at 7 PM, the GHTBL All-Star Team will face the CTL All-Star Team at Muzzy Field in Bristol, Connecticut. 

The matchup will be the fourth between the two leagues in which the GHTBL All-Stars remain unbeaten.

Muzzy Field, Bristol, Connecticut.

The following GHTBL players have been selected to the All-Star Team for the 2019 season:

1.  Michael Santiago, C/OF, East Hartford Jets

2.  Jeff Criscuolo, IF, East Hartford Jets

3.  Jimmy Schult, P, East Hartford Jets

4.  Jared Pflaumer, IF, Malloves Jewelers

5.  Johnny Martin, P, Malloves Jewelers

6.  Daren Grabowski, IF/OF, People’s United Bank

7.  Tyler Pina, OF, People’s United Bank

8.  Jack Risley, SS, People’s United Bank

9. Mac Finnegan, OF, People’s United Bank

10.  Eric Malinowski, P, People’s United Bank


11.  Tyler Repoli, 1B, Rainbow Graphics

12.  Jack Rich, OF, Record-Journal Expos

13.  Jason Sullivan, 3B, Record-Journal Expos

14.  A.J. Hendrickson, P/C, Record-Journal Expos

15  Charlie Hesseltine, P, Record-Journal Expos
 
16.  Shane Bogli, P, South Windsor Phillies

17.  Tyler Popp, C, Ulbrich Steel

18.  Peter Barrows, 1B, Ulbrich Steel

19.  Dan Livingston, P, Ulbrich Steel

20.  Nick Hock, P, Ulbrich Steel

21.  Ian Halpin, IF, Vernon Orioles

22.  Jack Halpin, IF, Vernon Orioles 

23.  Jordan English, OF/P, Vernon Orioles

24.  Matt Purnell, P, Vernon Orioles


Alternates:

1.  Marvin Gorgas, P, Malloves Jewelers  

2.  Brody Labbe, OF, South Windsor Phillies

3.  Aedin Wadja, 2B, South Windsor Phillies

4.  Ryan Pandolfi, C/IF, Rainbow Graphics

5.  Hector Gonzalez, SS, Record-Journal Expos

6.  Jonny Walter, OF, Record-Journal Expos


7.  Zach Donahue, IF/P, Vernon Orioles

2019 Playoff Tournament: August 5th to 14th

Postseason at Trinity College and Palmer Field.

The Greater Hartford Twilight Baseball League is excited to announce the 2019 Playoff Tournament schedule and bracket. This year, the majority of the double-elimination tournament will be hosted at Trinity College in Hartford, from August 5th until the 12th. 

Then, the final two games of the playoffs will determine a champion at Palmer Field in Middletown on August 13th and 14th. The Record-Journal Expos and Vernon Orioles are the top seeds entering the GHTBL postseason.  Seeding has yet to be determined.

#spreadingORANGE Series Scores $7,000+ for MS

MS4MS and GHTBL team up to fund the fight against Multiple Sclerosis.

On Sunday, July 21, the Greater Hartford Twilight Baseball League played a charity series for a third consecutive year at Dunkin’ Donuts Park. This year, the Twi-loop partnered with a fantastic nonprofit organization called MS4MS to present the #spreadingORANGE Series for MS.

The all-day event was major a success. In addition to spreading awareness for Multiple Sclerosis, GHTBL raised over $7,000 – the league’s largest amount ever raised by our benefit games.  Little 7-year-old John Hart threw out the ceremonial first pitch.

Thank you to the following sponsors of the #spreadingORANGE Series: CIGNA, MENCHIE’S FROZEN YOGURT OF WINDSOR, CONCENTRA, COILPRO and TUCCI LIMITED BAT COMPANY.

Hardball for Heroes at Palmer Field

4 games to benefit American Legion Post 75 on Sunday, July 14, 2019.

  • All 8 GHTBL teams will play 4 Regular Season games in a single day at Palmer Field to benefit the American Legion. 
     
  • $10 tickets are being sold at Malloves Jewelers at 404 Main Street Middletown, CT and will be available at the main gate on the day of the event.
     
  • Free for all veterans, military service members and kids 14 and under.

Pizzanello’s Return, a Life-changing Experience

Ron Pizzanello is manager of the South Windsor Phillies.

Magical things sometimes happen on and around the baseball field, and one need look no further than the South Windsor Phillies dugout to be reminded of this.

Ron Pizzanello, in his second year as coach after a reluctant return to a sport he left years ago, calls the shots there. He makes the lineup with players he recruited to this Greater Hartford Twilight Baseball League team. He argues with the umpires. This is where he comes and this is what he does to feel whole again.

“I don’t know what I’d do without baseball,” Pizzanello said.

About four years ago, with Type-1 diabetes wreaking havoc on his circulatory system, Pizzanello started having body parts removed. His left leg was amputated below the knee in 2015, and above the knee in 2016. Doctors took his right leg below the knee in 2017.

Ron Pizzanello, Manager, South Windsor Phillies, 2018.
(Photographer: Johnathon Henninger / Special to the Courant)

Pizzanello, a Hartford native who was a feisty catcher under Bill Holowaty at Eastern Connecticut before graduating in 1976, lost equally meaningful parts of himself through years of debilitating health, too — some pride, some purpose, a whole lot of confidence. He became depressed.

But what Pizzanello has gotten out of a return to baseball, with a nudge from Holowaty, speaks to the power of feeling included, the power of sport, the power of having someone believe in you, the power of human connection and common goals.

Pizzanello, prosthetic legs and wheelchair and all, is just another guy spending a few evenings a week on the dusty diamonds of central Connecticut, again just one of the boys.

“When you wake up in the morning and you know you have something to do, it’s good,” said Holowaty, who won 1,404 games and four national championships in 45 years at Eastern and is now the GHTBL president. “It makes your life a lot better. True or false? That’s what it’s doing for him, and I just feel delighted.”

South Windsor Phillies at Rotary Field, South Windsor, Connecticut.
(Photographer: Johnathon Henninger / Special to the Courant)

Holowaty hadn’t spoken much to Pizzanello, now of Eastford, over the years but kept up with his story, which included Pizzanello’s year as a professional baseball player in Italy just after graduating from college. He arrived at 195 pounds and left at 128 pounds.

He couldn’t figure out what was happening to his body. His father came for a visit and said it must be diabetes. People in Italy suggested the same. Pizzanello didn’t want to hear it.

“I was playing like crap, and that’s what really ticked me off,” Pizzanello said. “I was 22, and you don’t get diabetes at 22, but I had all the symptoms. I was eating like a horse and losing weight. My dad said he wanted me to return home. I said, ‘Dad, we’re one game out of first place and there’s a $15,000 bonus if we win the championship.’”

Pizzanello, now 64, stuck it out as long as he could.

Pizzanello fills out his scorebook, South Windsor, 2018.
(Photographer: Johnathon Henninger / Special to the Courant)

“We’d go to the best restaurant in town and I’d have a big dish of pasta,” he said. “They called it rigatoni abbondante. That means a lot. I’d eat the whole thing by myself. I’d have a steak or a fish. I’d have some kind of dessert. On the way home, I’d stop and get a big bottle of Coke. I’d have an ice cream.”

When Pizzanello returned to Connecticut he said his blood sugar was over 800 and doctors wondered how he was still alive. He began to properly manage his health and went about a relatively normal life. His first marriage lasted 28 years, and he is a father of three. He was a good player for years in the Twilight league for the Vernon Orioles, the team he coached against last week, until a case of frozen shoulder — people with diabetes are particularly susceptible — made it impossible for him to keep catching.

“I couldn’t hit, anyway, so if I couldn’t catch, I was done,” he said.

Pizzanello, who remarried last year, laughed. He has a lot to laugh about these days. There’s a joy in his voice, even when retracing the obstacles diabetes has produced since he stopped playing in 1990. He spent much of the next 10 years coaching American Legion ball while working as a mainframe system programmer for The Hartford and later IBM. He had a heart attack nearly 15 years ago and has a defibrillator. He had a kidney removed.

Eventually, Pizzanello’s legs were so damaged that blood wasn’t reaching his feet unless he stood, and it was impossible to sleep through agonizing pain. His prosthetic legs — one of which he goes without, occasionally, for fear of a skin infection — are emblazoned with Red Sox logos.

Baseball was always on his mind and in his heart. He didn’t think it was in his future. But Holowaty called last summer, urging him to coach the South Windsor team with the help of Gary Burnham.

“I said ‘Coach, I don’t know,’” Pizzanello said. “I could barely walk. I couldn’t hit a fungo, couldn’t do any of that stuff. And I was in the stages of depression.”

Manager Ron Pizzanello and the South Windsor Phillies, 2018.
(Photographer: Johnathon Henninger / Special to the Courant)

Holowaty kept on his former player, wouldn’t let Pizzanello accept limitations. Pizzanello’s return would be good for Pizzanello and good for a league that is always looking for tough, serious, knowledgeable baseball people.

That’s Pizzanello — tough guy, always, and a baseball guy again.

“It was probably the best decision I’ve made,” Pizzanello said. “I just got so into it. It changed my whole demeanor, everything. I had a lot of fun. Just being part of this has done wonders for me. You wouldn’t believe how much this means to me.”


Story printed in the Hartford Courant: https://www.courant.com/sports/hc-sp-greater-hartford-twilight-baseball-ron-pizzanello-column-20190612-ysxrs5ynhraspcvdnprdwmspju-story.html
 

Article written by Mike Anthony
Mike Anthony

Mike Anthony was named The Courant’s sports columnist in May 2018. He has written about the state’s most prominent athletic programs, including the UConn men’s basketball beat from ’05-11. After a five-year period focused on feature writing, Mike spent two years on the UConn football beat. He also covered the ’17-18 UConn women’s basketball season.

2019 GHTBL Regular Season Preview

Twilight League to reap benefits of developmental off season work.

The GHTBL, Connecticut’s premier amateur baseball league has made preparations for its 91st season.  Our 2019 Regular Season begins May 28th – Opening Day at Henry Park in Vernon at 6 PM, featuring defending champions, the Vernon Orioles vs. Rainbow Graphics.

As the season nears, we’d like to recognize Bill Holowaty and Andy Baylock, two of Connecticut’s greatest baseball dignitaries who sit atop the GHTBL Executive Committee.  Holowaty, a 4-time National Champion with ECSU enters his third season as President while Baylock, the former head baseball coach at UConn and 2-time Big East Champion serves as Vice President.  Holowaty and Baylock are GHTBL alumni themselves and aim to revive the prestige of the league.  They’ve led fundraising efforts, acquired top-notch baseball venues, and challenged league managers to recruit and compete at a higher level than in recent years.

This season, 8 revamped franchises will field a mix of collegiate ballplayers and several ex-professionals.  A new (and old) Middletown-based franchise, Malloves Jewelers has returned to the Twi-loop after a 25-year hiatus.  Malloves contended in the league from 1980 to 1993 under then owner, Jerome “Buzzy” Levin who passed away in 2017.  His son and proprietor of Malloves, Marc Levin, has stepped up as team sponsor and General Manager.  Levin  tapped former ECSU baseball captain and Cromwell High School head coach, Christian Budzik to be Manager.  The team will play home games at Palmer Field and at the newly constructed, Buzzy Levin Field in Middletown.

Other GHTBL franchises will return this summer vying for a league title.  In the West Division, People’s United Bank will sponsor a franchise yet again, backing Manager Tom Abbruzzese in his 43rd GHTBL season.  People’s will call Trinity College home and will feature Justin Morhardt, fresh off a professional stint in the Atlanta Braves organization.  A rebranded Ulbrich Steel team will test its metal with a revamped roster, including Will Musson, former UConn standout and 7-year veteran of professional baseball in France and Australia.  Charlie Hesseltine, Meriden native and former Atlantic League pitcher will step in as first-year Manager of the Record-Journal Expos

The East Division is also expected to provide parity.  The Vernon Orioles, behind Manager Jack Ceppetelli will seek their seventh straight Regular Season title.  The South Windsor Phillies franchise led by their General Manager and Reading Phillies Hall of Fame inductee, Gary Burnham Jr. will field a few pro-caliber players; Mike Hepple formerly in the New York Mets farm system and Kyle Richards, who made it to double-A with in the Kansas City Royals organization.

Almost an entirely new group of ballplayers have joined the East Hartford Jets franchise, led by their new Manager, Taylor Kosakowski, former closer at CCSU and Jimmy Schult, center fielder and 2011 D-III Player of the Year at ECSU.  Rainbow Graphics, a printing and embroidery business based in Manchester sponsors the same franchise that traces back to the 1960’s when Gene Johnson and his Moriarty Brothers club reigned supreme at Mount Nebo ParkRyan Pandolfi and Tyler Repoli will co-manage the Rainbow Graphics squad. 

2019 GHTBL Schedule of Events

July 14th – Hardball for Heroes Series at Palmer Field in Middletown – 4 ball games benefiting American Legion Post 75.

July 21st – #spreadingORANGE Series for MS at Dunkin’ Donuts Park – 4 ball games benefiting MS4MS, a national organization founded in Connecticut who fund Multiple Sclerosis research through Johns Hopkins Medicine.

August 2-11 ­– Playoff Tournament at Trinity College and Palmer Field – an 8 team, double-elimination tournament.


Did you know?
More than 350 professional ballplayers have competed in the Greater Hartford Twilight Baseball League since the league was founded.  MLB All-stars Jeff BagwellBernie WilliamsRob Dibble and Ricky Bottalico played in the GHTBL.  Most recently in 2018, left-handed pitcher for the Vernon Orioles and graduate of University of Bryant, Jack Patterson, was drafted in the 32nd round by the Chicago Cubs and now pitches for the South Bend Cubs of the Midwest League (single-A).

For more information about the league visit: GHTBL.org/history

For the full 2019 GHTBL Regular Season schedule: GHTBL.org/schedule

2019 Twilight Season Set to Begin

Opening Day is May 28th, 6 PM, Henry Park, Vernon, CT.

More than 90 years of twilight baseball will continue this summer as our league gets the 2019 GHTBL season underway.  Reigning champions, the Vernon Orioles and their longtime manager, Jack Ceppetelli will face off against last year’s runner-up, Rainbow Graphics of Manchester. 

Rainbow Graphics and the Vernon Orioles have replenished their rosters with newly recruited collegiate athletes to play alongside veteran twilight leaguers.  Co-managers, Tyler Repoli and Ryan Pandolfi will step into leadership roles for Rainbow Graphics this season. 

Meanwhile, the Orioles will field familiar names like the Dan Trubia and Tony Trubia as well as their upstart second baseman, Zach Donahue who has recently committed to play baseball at the University of Connecticut under another GHTBL alum Head Coach, Jim Penders.

Opening Day schedule:
– Tuesday, May 28th
– Henry Park in Vernon, Connecticut, on Frank J. McCoy Field. 
– Opening Day presentation and ceremonial first pitch at 5:55 PM.
– Bill Holowaty, GHTBL President will be master of ceremonies. 
– Game time is scheduled for 6 PM.  

A special thanks goes to the Town of Vernon Parks and Recreation for their continued support and cooperation.  The Vernon Orioles have been proud to represent the Town of Vernon since 1966.

Launching New Angle with “Games of the Week”

2019 season will feature live broadcasts on YouTube.

This summer, our historic twilight league will be advancing deeper into the digital age with live video broadcasts.  The 2019 season will usher in “Games of the Week” featuring Greater Hartford Twilight Baseball League action on our YouTube channel.  Wherever they might be, baseball fans will be able to watch two GTHBL games per week for free of all 8 teams.

These streams will be complete with commentary from Middletown native and amateur broadcaster, Dan Saccu who will break down all of the live baseball action on a twice-a-week basis.  Other commentators will likely chime as well.  To watch and get notified when streams begin, subscribe to our YouTube channel:

Click here to visit the GHTBL YouTube channel.

Stay tuned.  This summer is going to be great one.

– Macon Jefferys, GHTBL Video Coordinator

Bill Savitt, King of Diamonds

It was once written of Hartford’s most prolific baseball promoter that there were, “at least five Bill Savitt’s.”

1. The jeweler, who owned and operated a store on Asylum Street in Hartford.

2. The advertising genius who coined the phrase “Peace of Mind Guaranteed” often abbreviated to “P.O.M.G.”

3. The sportsman who created the Savitt Gems, Hartford’s preeminent semi-professional baseball club who played with and against some of the world’s best players.

4. The philanthropist who would speak in public if his fees went to charity.

5. The world traveler who met with the Pope in Rome and was made an honorary Roman citizen.

Bill Savitt, 1958.
Bill Savitt in front of Savitt Jewelers, 35 Asylum Street, Hartford, 1986.

William Myron “Bill” Savitt was born in Springfield, Massachusetts, on March 9, 1901, to Harold and Hattie (Fein) Savitt. At an early age, Bill Savitt worked as a newspaper boy, a theater usher and a field hand on a tobacco farm. He quit school in the tenth grade to start working full-time. Although he never enrolled in higher education, he would receive an honorary doctorate from Springfield College in 1980. His first steady job was at a Springfield jewelry store as an errand boy and clerk. Savitt soon relocated to Hartford, Connecticut, in 1917 and established his own store in 1919 called Savitt Jewelers, at a tiny shop on Park Street.

Savitt Jewelers, 1923.
Bill Savitt, 1925.
Savitt grand opening advertisement, 1925.
Savitt Jewelers, 1928.
Savitt presents watch to Bat Battalino, 1929.

Savitt worked twelve hour days to be available for customers. In 1935, he moved Savitt Jewelers for the final time to 35 Asylum Street, where the store became the largest retail jewelry business in the state. He transformed the business from a one-man operation into an enterprise employing seventy-five people, including fifteen jewelers. His catchy slogans “Savitt Jewelers, 35 Asylum Street, 35 seconds from Main Street” and “Peace of Mind Guaranteed” became household phrases across Connecticut.

Bill Savitt, 1935.
Bill Savitt, 1935.
Savitt Jewelers advertisement, 1932.
Savitt Jewelers exterior, 1936.

Throughout his life, Savitt was a devoted baseball fan, especially of Hartford-based teams but also of the Boston Red Sox. During the 1930’s and 1940’s Savitt sponsored and organized a baseball club known as the Savitt Gems. Amid the Great Depression and World War II, thousands paid admission to witness the Gems oppose professional clubs, semi-pro teams, barnstorming outfits, local amateurs and stars of the national game. Thanks to Savitt, Hall of Fame legends played in Hartford during the Golden Age of Baseball. Babe Ruth, Ted Williams, Jimmie Foxx, Satchel Paige and many others played at Hartford’s Bulkeley Stadium.

Bulkeley Stadium, Hartford, Connecticut, 1936.
Ruth, Williams, Foxx and Paige each visited Hartford to play against the Savitt Gems.

However, Bill Savitt’s primary motive for promoting the Gems was to benefit the Greater Hartford community. He led efforts to organize charity games for Camp Courant, the Red Cross, the United Service Organizations (USO) and many others. Savitt was often spotted in the sports section of the Hartford Courant or the Hartford Times newspapers gifting watches, medals and trophies to athletes and youngsters.

The Savitt Trophy, 1930.
Bill Savitt awards Camp Courant All-Stars, 1934.
Bill Savitt awards Camp Courant champions, 1935.

His support of Hartford sports also served as a clever marketing tactic for his business. While running the jewelry store, Bill Savitt embarked on his lifelong baseball journey in the spring of 1929. He decided to sponsor a team in the Hartford Twilight League (also known as the City Independent Twilight League). Then he rebranded Hartford’s Cardinal Athletic Club to the “Savitt’s Cardinals” who competed against top amateurs in the Greater Hartford area.

Twilight League standings, 1929.

Savitt’s team was made up of mostly Hartford residents. GHTBL Hall of Fame inductees, Frank “Bat” Orefice, a catcher, and Ray Kelly, an outfielder, were members of Savitt’s first club. When the regular season ended in a tie for the pennant, a playoff game was played between Savitt’s Cardinals and Economy Grocers. On September 28, 1929, at Hartford’s Colt Park, the Cardinals were shutout the Grocers 7-0 in the first championship game of Hartford Twilight League.

Frank “Bat” Orefice, Savitt’s Cardinals, 1929.
Ray Kelly, Savitt Gems, 1929.

Bill Savitt recommitted to the twi-loop in 1930 and created a new team called the Savitt Gems. The club starred a former pitcher for the Hartford Senators, Al Huband and brothers, George Dixon at third base and John Dixon at first base. The Gems wore white uniforms with navy piping and navy striped socks. They contended for a twilight championship against the Holy Name baseball club in a three-game playoff series.

1930 Savitt Gems, Hartford Twilight League Champions

Leading the Holy Names were another pair of brothers; James Jigger Farrell at first base and Tommy Farrell in left field. At shortstop for the Names was a future professional, Bert Meisner, while local ace “Click“ McGrath, handled mound duties. On Tuesday, August 19, 1930, a crowd of more than 7,000 spectators gathered at Colt Park in Hartford. Nelson “Lefty” Buckland allowed just three hits, guiding the Savitt Gems to victory (5-2). At an awards banquet later that year, Savitt gifted each Gems player a gold watch and a lobster dinner.

James “Jigger” Farrell, Holy Name, 1930.
Nelson “Lefty” Buckland, Savitt Gems, 1930.

The Savitt Gems returned to the Hartford Twilight League for the 1931 season, continuing to dominate. Savitt recruited new pitchers: Walter Berg from the Springfield Ponies of the Eastern League, Art Boisseau of Dartmouth College, and Russ Fisher, an amateur hurler from Scotland, Connecticut. First baseman and player-manager, Tommy Sipples was the team’s best hitter. Savitt’s team won a second straight championship, beating Holy Name yet again in the final game. George Dixon recorded two runs, a stolen base and an RBI single for the Gems, winning by a final tally of 11-5.

Hartford Courant excerpt, 1931.

In the summer of 1932, Bill Savitt’s Gems were drawing large crowds to Colt Park. Meanwhile, the Hartford Senators of the Eastern League experienced a sharp decrease in attendance. Midway through the season, the entire Eastern League collapsed, “under the pressure of economic conditions” of the Great Depression. Hartford baseball fans were without a professional team to root for at Bulkeley Stadium. The baseball void would not last long.

Hartford Senators disband after winning the Eastern League pennant, Bulkeley Stadium, 1932.

Despite widespread economic strife, Savitt swooped in to cure Hartford of its baseball woes. He leased Bulkeley Stadium and put the Savitt Gems on display as an independent, semi-professional ballclub. With a stadium and a championship team, Savitt operated the Gems as the Hartford’s primary baseball franchise. More often than not, the Gems played games at home due to Bulkeley Stadium’s excellent playing surface and central location. Savitt frequently scheduled his team to play doubleheaders on Sunday afternoons.

Hartford Courant excerpt, 1932.
Bulkeley Stadium scorecard, 1932.
Savitt Gems vs. West Hartford, 1932.
Hartford Courant excerpt, 1932.

Bill’s younger brother, Max Savitt, an attorney and later a Circuit Court judge also supported the Gems as a sponsor. The Savitt brothers signed several professional players, adding to a roster of Hartford Twilight League players. This semi-professional formula would captivate baseball audiences in Hartford for the next two decades. In addition to featuring his Gems at Bulkeley Stadium, Savitt used the ballpark to support civic life. He hosted numerous benefit games to fundraise for charitable causes.

1932 Savitt Gems, Hartford Twilight League champions at Bulkeley Stadium, Hartford. Bill Savitt (far left) and Max Savitt (far right).

For example, in the summer of 1932, the Savitt Gems faced off against a pitching phenom Pete “Lefty” Naktenis. The Hartford Public High School hurler played for the Frederick Raff company team, a refrigerator retailer in Hartford. The Gems seized the game by a score of 4 to 2. Bill Savitt and Frederick Raff donated $5,979.99 in ticket sales to Camp Courant after the game. Later that summer, the Savitt Gems won their third straight and final Hartford Twilight League championship.

Pete “Lefty” Naktenis, 1932.
1932 Savitt Gems at Bulkeley Stadium
Harry Deegan, Savitt Gems, 1932.

After leasing Bulkeley Stadium, Bill Savitt attempted to recruit New York Yankees slugger, Lou Gehrig who had just swept the Chicago Cubs in the 1932 World Series. The “Iron Horse” was well-known in Hartford because Gehrig had made his professional debut at the age of 18 with the Hartford Senators in 1921. Gehrig returned to Columbia University the following year to play fullback for the football team. Then he signed with the Senators again in 1923, propelling them to an Eastern League pennant.

Lou Gehrig, First Baseman, Hartford Senators, 1924.
Hartford Courant excerpt, 1932.

By the time Bill Savitt inquired about hiring Gehrig in 1932, he was a three-time World Series champion and American League MVP. The price to land Gehrig for a single game appearance was $500 and half of the gate receipts. Savitt determined Gehrig’s price to be too steep and pleasantly declined via telegram. Savitt’s plan to lure Gehrig was covered in the Hartford Courant and baseball fans in Connecticut were disappointed in the outcome. However, as Savitt had proved in the past, he would not be discouraged by the occasional defeat.

Hartford Courant excerpt, 1932.
Lou Gehrig, First Baseman, New York Yankees, 1932

Savitt welcomed all sorts of baseball clubs to Bulkeley Stadium. The first independent club to take on the Gems was McKesson-Robbins of Bridgeport, Connecticut. Manufacturing company teams like the Meriden Insilcos were common foes. Other opponents included the Bridgeport Bears, New Haven Chevies and clubs from Branford, Norwich, Torrington, Waterbury and Windsor.

1933 Savitt Gems.

On October 2, 1932, the Gems met the New Britain Falcons at Bulkeley Stadium. Savitt signed Rabbit Maranville of the Boston Braves as a guest star to bat leadoff. Jigger Farrell played left field and hit second in the Gems lineup. Former Boston Braves outfielder, John “Bunny” Roser hit third and former New York Yankees catcher Hank Karlon batted clean-up. Tommy Sipples hit fifth and blasted a home run in the game. Eastern League shortstop, Don Curry batted sixth and compiled three hits on the day. Former Hartford Senators pitcher, Johnny Miller hurled an excellent game, allowing one run on five hits. With their best lineup yet, the Gems beat the Falcons by a score of 4 to 1.

Johnny Miller, Pitcher, Savitt Gems, 1932.
Rabbit Maranville, Second Baseman, Savitt Gems, 1932.
Don Curry, Shortstop, Savitt Gems, 1932.

In March of 1933, Bill and Max Savitt attempted to revive professional baseball in Hartford. They attended an Eastern League meeting to discuss plans with regional owners. Yet plans for an Eastern League broke down. The Savitt brothers leased Bulkeley Stadium for another season while the Hartford Senators remained out of contention.

Bill Savitt and Max Savitt (standing, center) at an Eastern League meeting in 1933.

Growing ever-busy with his many pursuits, Savitt delegated baseball operations by hiring a business manager named Walter Hapgood. As a former front office executive of the Boston Braves and President of the Montreal Royals, Hapgood was well-connected among professional teams and players. He was sometimes called the ”P.T. Barnum of Baseball.” Savitt and Hapgood ran the Gems like a professional club, while wooing Major League and traveling teams to Hartford.

Walter Hapgood, Business Manager, Savitt Gems, 1933.
Hartford Courant excerpt, 1933.

The Savitt Gems of 1933 were coached by former Hartford Senators Manager, Bill Gleason. Big leaguers such as Bruce Caldwell, Pat Loftus, and RobertRed Munn joined as full-time players. Out-of-work Eastern Leaguers George Underhill, Cy Waterman, and Henry “Pop” LaFleur glowed for the Gems. They entertained large gatherings of fans at Bulkeley Stadium against teams like the Detroit Clowns, Pennsylvania Red Caps, House of David and the Georgia Chain Gang.

Bill Savitt’s baseball club caused quite the stir when Connie Mack’s Philadelphia Athletics visited Hartford. During harsh economic times, Savitt made a risky payment of a $500 to guarantee the game. On Thursday, June 15, 1933, the Athletics traveled to Hartford on a train that accidentally derailed. The A’s and their power-hitting first baseman, Jimmie Foxx safely arrived an hour late to the ballpark. Connie Mack took another train that was delayed in Philadelphia, and he ultimately was unable to make the trip.

Ready or not, the A’s handled the Savitt Gems easily, winning by a score of 6 to 1. Gems batters were no match for the pitching of “Big Jim Peterson who earned a complete game win. Foxx, the Major League leader in home runs at the time, was held to a base hit. A few days later, Connie Mack telephoned Bill Savitt to thank him for hosting his Athletics, asking, “Is there anything I can do for you?” To which Savitt replied, “Just tell the other teams what kind of guy I am.” From that day forward, professional teams called on Savitt for exhibition games.

Jimmie Foxx, Philadelphia Athletics, 1933.

On August 2, 1933, Savitt and his Gems met the Boston Red Sox in another Bulkeley Stadium blockbuster. On a hot and humid day, the Gems sparkled brightly behind their newest big league signing, starting pitcher Bill Morrell. The Red Sox collected eight hits and scored a lone earned run off of Morrell. With the Gems up 2 to 1 in the top of the seventh inning Red Sox pitcher, Dusty Cooke smashed a two-run triple. The Savitt Gems lost a close one to the Red Sox by a final of 3 to 2.

Savitt Gems vs. Red Sox, 1933.
Bill Morrell, Pitcher, Savitt Gems, 1933.
Boston Red Sox vs. Savitt Gems, 1933.
Marty McManus, Player-Manager, Boston Red Sox, 1933.

On August 28, 1933, the Pittsburgh Pirates and their fifty nine year old player-manager Honus Wagner came to Hartford. Wagner was accompanied by Hall of Famers, Pie Traynor, Freddie Lindstrom, Lloyd Waner and his brother, Paul Waner. Each of them collected a hit besides Wagner, who served as base coach until the top of the ninth inning. Wagner pinch hit and grounded out. The Gems featured Chicago White Sox outfielder, Bill Barrett as a guest star. Gems first basemen, Jigger Farrell had three hits while centerfielder, Jimmy Coyle had a pair of singles. The Pirates scratched the Gems 9-4 before more than 4,000 fans at Bulkeley Stadium.

Savitt Gems vs. Pittsburgh Pirates, 1933.
Honus Wagner, Manager, Pittsburgh Pirates, 1933.
Pat Loftus, Pitcher, Savitt Gems, 1933.

As Bill Savitt revolutionized Hartford sporting events, he also created a more inclusive baseball community. He quietly became a trailblazer of Baseball Integration more than a decade before Major League Baseball permitted people of color. Savitt was one of the first baseball owners in the nation to open the game to minority players. In a segregated time, Savitt hosted all persons of color at Bulkeley Stadium. He signed black and latino pitchers as well as several baseball legends of color. As a progressive thinker and a humanitarian, Bill Savitt refused to discriminate based on race or skin color.

1935 New York Black Yankees.

Savitt organized integrated games between Negro League teams and his Gems on Hartford’s grandest stage. The Brooklyn Royal Giants, New York Cubans, New York Black Yankees, Boston Hoboes and the Schenectady Black Sox were billed as perennial foes of the Gems. Others included the Boston Royal Giants, Philadelphia Colored Giants, Newark Eagles and the Jersey City Colored Athletics faced the Gems throughout the 1930’s. There were also barnstorming outfits like the Hawaiian All-Stars led by player-manager, Bucky Lai as well as Mexico’s Carta Blanca baseball club, featuring pitching ace, Luis Longoria. Even a popular female player, Jackie Mitchell, was Savitt’s guest of honor.

Philadelphia Colored Giants vs. Savitt Gems, 1933.
Jackie Mitchell, Pitcher, 1933.
Savitt Gems vs. Brooklyn Royal Giants, 1935.
Al Nalua, Pitcher, Hawaiian All-Stars, 1935.
Luis Longoria, Pitcher, Carta Blanca, 1937.

In August of 1933, Savitt’s club did battle with Harjo’s Oklahoma Indians captained by Jim Thorpe, the multi-sport athlete and Olympic gold medalist. The Gems and Indians appeared in a controversial five-game series, highlighted by Thorpe’s outrage over umpiring. In the bottom of the fourth inning of game one, Gems shortstop Jackie Cronin hit a long fly ball to right field. Thorpe missed the catch while running across the foul line. The home plate umpire John “Boggy” Muldoon ruled the ball fair and Cronin had himself an RBI triple.